Fall 2020 Courses

WR 12000: Growing as a Writer

Critical Reading and Writing in the Disciplines
Prof. Nicole MacLaughlin
WR 12200-01 / Days and Times TBA

Course description coming soon.

Critical Reading and Writing in the Disciplines
Prof. Damian Zurro
WR 12200-02 / Days and Times TBA

Course description coming soon.

WR 12200: Writing and Rhetoric Tutorial

Critical Reading and Writing in the Disciplines
Prof. Nicole MacLaughlin
WR 12200-01 / Days and Times TBA

Course description coming soon.

Critical Reading and Writing in the Disciplines
Prof. Damian Zurro
WR 12200-02 / Days and Times TBA

Course description coming soon.

Critical Reading and Writing in the Disciplines
Prof. Damian Zurro
WR 12200-03 / Days and Times TBA

Course description coming soon.

Critical Reading and Writing in the Disciplines
Prof. Nicole MacLaughlin
WR 12200-04 / Days and Times TBA

Course description coming soon.

WR 12300: Advanced Writing and Rhetoric Tutorial

Critical Thinking and English Academic Writing
Prof. Nicole MacLaughlin
WR 12300-01 / Days and Times TBD

Students enrolled in WR 12200 will have completed or be concurrently enrolled in Writing and Rhetoric 13100, 13200, or 13300. This course will offer strategies for successful written and verbal communication in the English academic context. Students will learn critical thinking practices, developing their capacity for thinking like a scholar in the context of different disciplines. Consisting of one weekly one-on-one instruction session and one weekly guided small-group session, this course helps students to develop an awareness of their strengths and weaknesses and to realize their potential as academic writers. Enrollment by departmental approval.

Critical Thinking and English Academic Writing
Prof. Damian Zurro
WR 12300-02 / Days and Times TBD

Students enrolled in WR 12200 will have completed or be concurrently enrolled in Writing and Rhetoric 13100, 13200, or 13300. This course will offer strategies for successful written and verbal communication in the English academic context. Students will learn critical thinking practices, developing their capacity for thinking like a scholar in the context of different disciplines. Consisting of one weekly one-on-one instruction session and one weekly guided small-group session, this course helps students to develop an awareness of their strengths and weaknesses and to realize their potential as academic writers. Enrollment by departmental approval.

WR 12350: Setting SMART Goals

Prof. Nicole MacLaughlin
WR 12350-01 / Days and Times TBA

Course description coming soon.

Prof. Damian Zurro
WR 12350-02 / Days and Times TBA

Course description coming soon.

WR 13100: Writing and Rhetoric

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Margie Housley
WR 13100-01 / TR 11:00 to 12:15

Course description coming soon. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Writing as a Form of Social Witness
Prof. Jessica Shumake
WR 13100-02 / TR 9:30 to 10:45

In this course you will make and support arguments, which you will frame for a target audience you identify. During the semester we will focus on invention, reflection, inquiry, and revision. Virtues of discourse such as honesty, knowledge, accountability, generosity, courage, and good judgment are at the heart of what it means to communicate well and to practice ethical inquiry and research in this course. The course requires you to write four major assignments: a narrative argument, a rebuttal argument, a proposal argument, and a revision and reflection portfolio. Our course theme is writing as a form of social witness. Given that reading and writing are reciprocal processes, we will read the work of writers who have thought about how their individual worlds and private lives influence them and who decided to break the silence to speak in order to reach toward more universal and shared human experiences. One responsibility of the writer, as an individual, is to bear witness to our shared social lives. Writing can give us insight not only into the human condition, but can also help us pass on stories that may help others survive emotionally and spiritually—or at least to think more deeply about what it means to be human and what gives our lives meaning. 

Writing and Rhetoric: The Art of Conversation
Prof. Laura MacGowan
WR 13100-03 / TR 3:30 to 4:45

You have important things to say, things that will help your world become more whole.This course aims to help you refine and communicate those things, those “arguments,” in order to maximize their positive impact. Good arguments are less about fighting, and more about engaging in productive conversation that is based on sound claims supported by true evidence. With this definition in mind, we’ll spend this semester working on becoming better conversationalists. We’ll think about what it means to be careful and compassionate listeners, especially to opinions and communication styles different from our own, and to evaluate and analyze the messages we hear on a daily basis. We’ll also consider what it means for us to be responsible contributors to that conversation through ethical, effective writing. Practically, we’ll spend most of our time working in public-facing genres—major assignments include a public letter, a feature article (à la The Atlantic), and a TED Talk. We’ll become better researchers, learning to integrate academic and non-academic sources into our own thinking, and we’ll practice the writing and revision strategies that will enable us to articulate our ideas with excellence. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Writing as a Form of Social Witness
Prof. Jessica Shumake
WR 13100-04 / TR 2:00 to 3:15

In this course you will make and support arguments, which you will frame for a target audience you identify. During the semester we will focus on invention, reflection, inquiry, and revision. Virtues of discourse such as honesty, knowledge, accountability, generosity, courage, and good judgment are at the heart of what it means to communicate well and to practice ethical inquiry and research in this course. The course requires you to write four major assignments: a narrative argument, a rebuttal argument, a proposal argument, and a revision and reflection portfolio. Our course theme is writing as a form of social witness. Given that reading and writing are reciprocal processes, we will read the work of writers who have thought about how their individual worlds and private lives influence them and who decided to break the silence to speak in order to reach toward more universal and shared human experiences. One responsibility of the writer, as an individual, is to bear witness to our shared social lives. Writing can give us insight not only into the human condition, but can also help us pass on stories that may help others survive emotionally and spiritually—or at least to think more deeply about what it means to be human and what gives our lives meaning. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Ethical Discourse Across Media
Prof. Kasey Swanke
WR 13100-05 / TR 12:30 to 1:45

Albus Dumbledore remarked that "words are our most inexhaustible source of magic--capable of both inflicting injury and remedying it." Every day we encounter words and arguments, some of which are injurious to discourse and some of which promote peace, fairness, and dialogue. Focusing on issues of contemporary and ethical significance, we will learn how to use words, images, sounds, and other forms of media to persuade others in ways that serve ourselves and our audiences. 

This course prepares you for writing successfully in your current and future courses at Notre Dame. Each class that you take here will introduce you to specific conversations regarding topics of moral, political, scientific, and intellectual significance. Thinking about them often requires qualifications, trade-offs, and excruciating honesty. Navigating and responding to them well requires a keen understanding of argumentation and presentation tactics. While we develop a diverse rhetorical toolkit and strategies for successful writing, our multimodal focus will lend us the advantage of sharpening these portable skills across media spanning commercial advertisements, film, and scholarly journal articles, to name just a few. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetorics of the Digital
Prof. Nathaniel Myers
WR 13100-06 / TR 3:30 to 4:45

Is it possible that, by the time you finish college, a machine will be able to write essays better than you, your classmates, and your professors? Well, not likely for any of us--and yet, we live in a world where this situation doesn't seem outside the realm of possibility. Already it is clear that our digital world exerts a powerful effect on us, such that we seem as much tools of our computers and iPhones as they are tools for us. We live our lives through an Instagram filter, in the 140-character tweet, and with a 10-second Snapchat video. In this course, we will consider the rhetorics of our digital world and the literacies (visual, digital, information) we require to negotiate that world, literacies we are already, however unwittingly, quite skilled in. Alongside text-based scholarship, we will draw on film, video essays, and other media platforms to formulate our own claims, discussion, and writing around topics like new media, information literacy and "post-truth" culture, and digital-born composition and argumentation. Assignments will include a visual analysis paper, a research paper focusing on the aforementioned topics, and a final assignment that integrates personal narrative with digital-born argument. 

Writing and Rhetoric: The Rhetoric of Narrative
Prof. Chanel Cox
WR 13100-07 / MWF 9:25 to 10:15

"What I want to know . . . is whether an internet search has a plot. There is an intense interaction and a development, a personality, and even a rising conflict and eventual resolution." These humorous lines from the 2017 novel Dear Cyborgs highlight a central theme of this course: the close relationship between writing and narrative. Narrative offers a powerful rhetorical tool for writers and speakers seeking to connect with their audiences and are often present even whenever no "story" is explicitly being told. For instance, the presidential election slogan "Make America Great Again" creates a narrative about the United States. It gestures towards an unspecified past where America was great and argues that, though America no longer had that greatness, its citizens could obtain it again through the election. Every form of writing, from tweets, advertisements and newspaper articles to argumentative essays and research papers, generates a "narrative" in the selection, ordering, and presentation of materials. In this course you will not only learn to be a more critical consumer of the countless narratives that we encounter on a daily basis, but will learn how to skillfully and ethically craft your own. By teaching you to pay careful attention to narrative and other rhetorical choices in writing, this course will prepare you for college-level thinking, writing, and critical reading. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetorics of the Digital
Prof. Nathaniel Myers
WR 13100-08 / TR 11:00 to 12:15

Is it possible that, by the time you finish college, a machine will be able to write essays better than you, your classmates, and your professors? Well, not likely for any of us--and yet, we live in a world where this situation doesn't seem outside the realm of possibility. Already it is clear that our digital world exerts a powerful effect on us, such that we seem as much tools of our computers and iPhones as they are tools for us. We live our lives through an Instagram filter, in the 140-character tweet, and with a 10-second Snapchat video. In this course, we will consider the rhetorics of our digital world and the literacies (visual, digital, information) we require to negotiate that world, literacies we are already, however unwittingly, quite skilled in. Alongside text-based scholarship, we will draw on film, video essays, and other media platforms to formulate our own claims, discussion, and writing around topics like new media, information literacy and "post-truth" culture, and digital-born composition and argumentation. Assignments will include a visual analysis paper, a research paper focusing on the aforementioned topics, and a final assignment that integrates personal narrative with digital-born argument. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetorics of the Digital
Prof. Nathaniel Myers
WR 13100-09 / TR 2:00 to 3:15

Is it possible that, by the time you finish college, a machine will be able to write essays better than you, your classmates, and your professors? Well, not likely for any of us--and yet, we live in a world where this situation doesn't seem outside the realm of possibility. Already it is clear that our digital world exerts a powerful effect on us, such that we seem as much tools of our computers and iPhones as they are tools for us. We live our lives through an Instagram filter, in the 140-character tweet, and with a 10-second Snapchat video. In this course, we will consider the rhetorics of our digital world and the literacies (visual, digital, information) we require to negotiate that world, literacies we are already, however unwittingly, quite skilled in. Alongside text-based scholarship, we will draw on film, video essays, and other media platforms to formulate our own claims, discussion, and writing around topics like new media, information literacy and "post-truth" culture, and digital-born composition and argumentation. Assignments will include a visual analysis paper, a research paper focusing on the aforementioned topics, and a final assignment that integrates personal narrative with digital-born argument. 

Writing and Rhetoric: The Rhetoric of Resistance
Prof. Mer Kaplan
WR 13100-10 / TR 9:30 to 10:45

Is resistance futile? What, exactly, constitutes an act of resistance? Why do some expressions of resistance spark a movement while others fizzle before they flourish? This class will focus on the rhetoric of resistance, from classical examples to current causes. We'll explore how resistance can be enacted in such forms as the written and spoken word, music, art, and film. Through this lens, we'll delve into how
these pieces make meaning and address counterarguments that may complicate how we see these works and acts. Indeed, as we analyze these issues, we will strive to (re)define our beliefs in a reasonable, intelligent manner, which is the foundation of ethical argumentation. Regular class discussions and workshops will inform our writing process by giving us the opportunity to hear diverse opinions and, therefore, push us to rigorously investigate and honestly articulate our own thoughts. Finally, we will go beyond structuring well-argued essays and consider such stylistic issues as voice and audience, enhancing the rhetorical capabilities of our writing. Major class projects include a narrative essay, a rhetorical analysis, a visual analysis, and a research essay. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Writing as a Form of Social Witness
Prof. Jessica Shumake
WR 13100-11 / TR 11:00 to 12:15

In this course you will practice inquiry, reflection, invention, and revision. You will learn how to use stylistic conventions for a variety of situations, recognize established and emergent argument forms, offer evidence, evaluate information sources, and consider alternative perspectives. Throughout the semester you will select an audience, purpose, and context for the questions you ask and the provisional answers you offer. Questions concerning the obligations writers have to their readers and speakers have to their listeners will enable you to distinguish better from worse practices for ethical communication with your intended audience.

By the end of the course, you will be able to field questions such as: What are the uses of rhetoric? What must one know to create meaning and achieve one's purpose in specific contexts? How do I incorporate research and others' interpretations into my writing? What are best practices for evaluating digital information? Finally, we will engage with the questions that emerge when analyzing and evaluating different styles of writing and different ways of structuring an argument, which pulls in some or all of the habits of mind that are at the heart of studying what it means to write well and to practice ethical inquiry. 

Writing and Rhetoric: The Call to Write
Prof. Joanna Want
WR 13100-12 / TR 11:00 to 12:15

What do an Instagram post, philosophy paper, obituary, commencement speech, yelp review, lab report, and college application essay have in common? They are all genres of writing with a particular set of conventions that guide both readers and writers. Most of us write every day for a variety of purposes: academic, social, or professional. In each case, we answer a “call to write,” which may originate from external demands or from an internally felt desire to communicate with others and change situations we care about. Using genre, rhetorical situation, and rhetorical virtues as guiding concepts, we’ll build upon your previous knowledge as we craft a framework for successfully navigating writing situations at the university and beyond. To this end, we’ll study instances when writers have effectively responded to the call to write in ways powerful, creative, or unconventional. Throughout the semester, you will compose in a variety of genres intended to persuade and influence others. By semester’s end, you will have gained a better understanding of what you, as a resourceful and ethical writer, can accomplish when you answer the call to write. 

Writing and Rhetoric: The Call to Write
Prof. Joanna Want
WR 13100-13 / TR 12:30 to 1:45

What do an Instagram post, philosophy paper, obituary, commencement speech, yelp review, lab report, and college application essay have in common? They are all genres of writing with a particular set of conventions that guide both readers and writers. Most of us write every day for a variety of purposes: academic, social, or professional. In each case, we answer a “call to write,” which may originate from external demands or from an internally felt desire to communicate with others and change situations we care about. Using genre, rhetorical situation, and rhetorical virtues as guiding concepts, we’ll build upon your previous knowledge as we craft a framework for successfully navigating writing situations at the university and beyond. To this end, we’ll study instances when writers have effectively responded to the call to write in ways powerful, creative, or unconventional. Throughout the semester, you will compose in a variety of genres intended to persuade and influence others. By semester’s end, you will have gained a better understanding of what you, as a resourceful and ethical writer, can accomplish when you answer the call to write. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Persuasion in the Public Sphere
Prof. Arpit Kumar
WR 13100-14 / MWF 12:50 to 1:40

The coronavirus outbreak, the U.S. presidential election of 2020, and the release of the next James Bond film are examples of public events which generate opinion on various media platforms. In our class, we shall ask how public opinion is shaped using rhetoric. In its most positive sense, public opinion is a source of legitimacy as well as a check on power. It is a measure of the balance of a community’s thoughts and performs the task of drawing boundaries between public/private, true/false, and political/apolitical. However, public opinion is also ephemeral, intangible, and endlessly vulnerable to manipulation. Various stakeholders influence public opinion through media platforms such as the news, advertising, social networks, film, books etc. We shall analyze representative public ‘events’, the rhetorical situations they create, and understand how acts of speech and writing– in media ranging from news to blog posts to tweets – create moments of persuasion. In doing so, we will emphasize the inherently ethical relations the task of persuasion places us in and attempt to cultivate rhetorical virtues of truthfulness, sincerity, and responsibility. Participants will be required to engage in invigorating discussions, write weekly forum posts, submit 3 short written assignments, a research paper, and present an oral report. 

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Ian Gerdon
WR 13100-15 / MWF 8:20 to 9:10

an people change their minds? Can they find common ground? Why would they bother to try? From Aristotle to George Washington to the study of 20th century totalitarianism, we find a similar theme: when people can’t or won’t talk to each other, violence and tyranny are on the horizon. Without dialogue and the trust that makes it possible, self-governance and a meaningful search for truth may be doomed. So how does dialogue work, how does persuasion work, and what kind of people do we need to be to make them work?

In this class, we will consider why we communicate and what standards and goals guide our efforts to communicate effectively as well as ethically. In the process, we will examine how to read and write as forms of dialogue, how Aristotle’s theory of persuasion can illuminate our public discourse, how persuasion differs from propaganda, and what the barriers to and possibilities of dialogue are today, as well as how we can tell stories that are both true and meaningful. We’ll take our lead from philosophy, literature, art, politics, and religion. In the end, hopefully, we’ll emerge as better students, citizens, and human beings—as well as better writers. 

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Kyriana Lynch
WR 13100-16 / MWF 8:20 to 9:10

In this course, we will reflect on the practical ways that writing affects our lives in the classroom, in the workplace, and in our day-to-day interactions. Even in a text to your parents, a cover letter for a job application, or your social media posts, you are already a writer, whether you realize it or not. This course will sharpen your ability to perceive and respond to others’ arguments and address your work to specific audiences. You will be equipped with tools and skills to craft your own narratives, analyze others’ evidence, and present research-based arguments. You bring your own concerns, experiences, and voice to the classroom. We will focus on sharpening the skills and interests that you already have in order to present your thoughts and yourself to the world in compelling and reflective ways. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetoric of Wellness
Prof. Heidi Arndt
WR 13100-17 / MWF 12:50 to 1:40

What does it mean to be well? Thanks to the popularity of concepts like self care, mindfulness, and sustainability, we may feel pressured to increase our own and our community’s wellness, but the sheer volume of content can be overwhelming. In this class, we will take a closer look at the sources that construct and constrain our understanding of “the good life” in order to become critical consumers and producers of wellness content. Especially in light of the global health crisis, it’s now more important than ever to consider how we talk about wellness and the effect of our rhetoric on others. Over the course of the semester we will move from an inward focus on physical and mental wellness to an outward look at environmental and social spheres. By analyzing and responding to existing arguments about everything from skincare to zero-waste households, you will develop a keen rhetorical awareness that will inform your own writing on these topics. Because everyone wants to be well, but not everyone agrees on what that looks like, we must also carefully consider the ethics involved in making claims on these topics, and our responsibility to our readers. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetoric, Ethics, and Cultural Community
Prof. Elizabeth Capdevielle
WR 13100-18 / MWF 9:25 to 10:15

This writing studio course includes guided discussions, intensive workshops, extensive drafting processes, and one-on-one conferences with the professor, all designed to help students sharpen their rhetorical skills and put them to good use in university-level academic writing. Student professionalism is essential in this fun, challenging, and highly focused collaborative environment, as we study the messages that shape our culture today. Assignments and discussions address a wide variety of topics, from politics to commercial advertising to science. Each student completes a major research paper project, developing an original question on a topic that suits his or her own interests and values, while becoming comfortable using an academic research library. Along with taking a leadership role in discussion, each student also practices public speaking by presenting original research in a formal talk. We complete the course with final reflections on rhetoric and ethics in our cultural communities. 

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Adam Kerker
WR 13100-19 / MWF 8:20 to 9:10

Writing and Rhetoric both prepares students for and engages them in new writing and rhetorical situations, especially those they will encounter as members of the university community. At its core, this course offers instruction and practice in inquiry, writing as a process, thinking rhetorically, using sources, and giving and receiving feedback. As a student in this class, you will learn to ask questions about complex issues, to find ways of answering those questions no matter how challenging they may be, and to shape your research findings for a variety of purposes and audiences. You will also learn ways of gathering and evaluating sources, taking notes and observing patterns between texts, and producing your own original texts that meet different rhetorical goals. Assignments include a rhetorical analysis essay, in which you will assess the rhetorical dimensions of a speech, video, or written piece, and a research essay presenting your intervention in a scholarly conversation on a topic that interests you. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetoric and American Identity
Prof. Hades Chavanne
WR 13100-20 / MWF 9:25 to 10:15

What factors shaped the formation of the Unites States’ national identity, and how does that national identity influence who we become as individuals? In this course, we will investigate the ways in which rhetoric practices produce and shape the socio-cultural aspects of American identity, ideals, and ethics. We will critically examine various forms of written, oral, and visual cultural artifacts, considering their rhetorically mediated social, racial, political, gendered, cultural, and economic frameworks. It is through these frameworks that we navigate our existence: how we understand who we are, what our place in the world is, and what our moral responsibilities to ourselves and to others are. Throughout this course, students will build upon their critical thinking, writing, and research skills through the ethical rhetorical lenses which we will develop together. 

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Erik Fuhrer
WR 13100-21 / TR 12:30 to 1:45

Course description coming soon. 

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Mitchell Kooh
WR 13100-22 / TR 5:05 to 6:20

Rhetoric is everywhere. Whether you are writing a research paper for school, interviewing for a summer job, or creating a course description for your new Writing and Rhetoric students, you are participating in a rhetorical act. In this course, we will try to understand those acts by working through various examples of rhetoric from a wide range of authors and forms of communication, everything from Classical texts to YouTube videos. How do these rhetoricians new and old work within established forms of argumentation? How do they mobilize different types of research and stylistic conventions for their specific rhetorical situations? What are the ethical implications of their rhetoric? And, ultimately, how can they help you to become a better writer and researcher? To this end, you will complete short weekly writing tasks as well as several larger assignments covering different types of writing, including but not limited to: arguing from personal experience, arguing in opposition, and arguing for a solution. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetoric, Ethics, and Cultural Community
Prof. Elizabeth Capdevielle
WR 13100-23 / MWF 12:50 to 1:40

This writing studio course includes guided discussions, intensive workshops, extensive drafting processes, and one-on-one conferences with the professor, all designed to help students sharpen their rhetorical skills and put them to good use in university-level academic writing. Student professionalism is essential in this fun, challenging, and highly focused collaborative environment, as we study the messages that shape our culture today. Assignments and discussions address a wide variety of topics, from politics to commercial advertising to science. Each student completes a major research paper project, developing an original question on a topic that suits his or her own interests and values, while becoming comfortable using an academic research library. Along with taking a leadership role in discussion, each student also practices public speaking by presenting original research in a formal talk. We complete the course with final reflections on rhetoric and ethics in our cultural communities. 

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Eric Lewis
WR 13100-24 / TR 3:30 to 4:45

Recent events have demonstrated the need to effectively communicate across distances, both physical and metaphorical. All of us have been isolated while sheltering in place or quarantining in response to the coronavirus pandemic, and we have thus been forced to communicate and come together in new ways. To extend the notion of “distance” into metaphor, we have also seen politics and public life become ever more divided, even as we have faced increasingly worse crises. Many feel that distances of identity, ideology, and media bubble cannot be crossed, leaving us paralyzed in the face of pandemic, social unrest, and climate change. In this course, we will work together on developing college-level communication skills, with particular attention to the conditions underlying such distances that may divide a writer and segments of their audience and the means of crossing them. 

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Ian Gerdon
WR 13100-25 / MWF 9:25 to 10:15

Can people change their minds? Can they find common ground? Why would they bother to try? From Aristotle to George Washington to the study of 20th century totalitarianism, we find a similar theme: when people can’t or won’t talk to each other, violence and tyranny are on the horizon. Without dialogue and the trust that makes it possible, self-governance and a meaningful search for truth may be doomed. So how does dialogue work, how does persuasion work, and what kind of people do we need to be to make them work?

In this class, we will consider why we communicate and what standards and goals guide our efforts to communicate effectively as well as ethically. In the process, we will examine how to read and write as forms of dialogue, how Aristotle’s theory of persuasion can illuminate our public discourse, how persuasion differs from propaganda, and what the barriers to and possibilities of dialogue are today, as well as how we can tell stories that are both true and meaningful. We’ll take our lead from philosophy, literature, art, politics, and religion. In the end, hopefully, we’ll emerge as better students, citizens, and human beings—as well as better writers. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetoric, Ethics, and Cultural Community
Prof. Elizabeth Capdevielle
WR 13100-26 / MWF 11:30 to 12:20

This writing studio course includes guided discussions, intensive workshops, extensive drafting processes, and one-on-one conferences with the professor, all designed to help students sharpen their rhetorical skills and put them to good use in university-level academic writing. Student professionalism is essential in this fun, challenging, and highly focused collaborative environment, as we study the messages that shape our culture today. Assignments and discussions address a wide variety of topics, from politics to commercial advertising to science. Each student completes a major research paper project, developing an original question on a topic that suits his or her own interests and values, while becoming comfortable using an academic research library. Along with taking a leadership role in discussion, each student also practices public speaking by presenting original research in a formal talk. We complete the course with final reflections on rhetoric and ethics in our cultural communities. 

WR 13200: Community-Based Writing and Rhetoric

Community-Based Writing and Rhetoric: Writing About the Environment in Indiana
Prof. Joanna Want
WR 13200-01 / TR 9:30 to 10:45

In this course, we will explore the contemplative and action-oriented aspects of writing with a special focus on sustainability and our surrounding environments in South Bend, St. Joseph County, and the state of Indiana. Using the concepts of genre, rhetorical situation, and rhetorical virtues, we will study how various writers have documented and reflected back the beauty and value of Indiana landscapes to their readers; how they have used writing for activism, sustainability, and conservation efforts; and how they have used writing experientially to deepen their engagement with the environment. In turn, through course assignments and exercises, you will have the opportunity to use writing in these same ways. Due to Covid-19 safety precautions, we will not leave campus for course-related excursions. However, we will work with a community partner organization, using writing and research to support and document the creation of community gardens in the city of South Bend. 

WR 13300: Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric: Identity, Community, and Ethical Argument in a Digital Age 
Prof. Erin McLaughlin
WR 13300-01 / MWF 10:30 to 11:20

This course is an introduction to rhetoric, writing, and research. As a multimedia-focused course, we will identify, analyze, and compose arguments across a variety of media. Our reading and writing efforts this semester will center on the role of identity and community values in argumentation. Drawing from a variety of scholarly and popular source material, we will explore how key dimensions of digital culture shape the way we experience and react to arguments in a digital age. Throughout these discussions, we will give special attention to ethical virtues of argumentation and the form those virtues take across argumentative forms and contexts. 

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric: Digital Arguments
Prof. Partrick Clauss
WR 13300-02 / TR 12:30 to 1:45

Two thousand years ago, someone wanting to share a message--to influence others--had a rather limited set of options: That person could write a letter, shout in a public place, or perhaps send up smoke signals. Today, communicators have an unprecedented number of options, including television, radio, cell phones, YouTube, Twitter . . . the list goes on. Available media have exploded in recent years. However, have the fundamental components of the messages themselves also changed? What about ethical argument methods and structures--have they changed, too? Finally, what might we learn about digital arguments, for instance, from Aristotle’s classic On Rhetoric? Such questions will guide our work this semester as we investigate the ways humans use (and misuse) symbols, like language, to influence others in the 21st century. 

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric: Identity, Community, and Ethical Argument in a Digital Age 
Prof. Erin McLaughlin
WR 13300-03 / MWF 11:30 to 12:20 

This course is an introduction to rhetoric, writing, and research. As a multimedia-focused course, we will identify, analyze, and compose arguments across a variety of media. Our reading and writing efforts this semester will center on the role of identity and community values in argumentation. Drawing from a variety of scholarly and popular source material, we will explore how key dimensions of digital culture shape the way we experience and react to arguments in a digital age. Throughout these discussions, we will give special attention to ethical virtues of argumentation and the form those virtues take across argumentative forms and contexts. 

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric: Digital Arguments
Prof. Partrick Clauss
WR 13300-04 / TR 2:00 to 3:15

Two thousand years ago, someone wanting to share a message--to influence others--had a rather limited set of options: That person could write a letter, shout in a public place, or perhaps send up smoke signals. Today, communicators have an unprecedented number of options, including television, radio, cell phones, YouTube, Twitter . . . the list goes on. Available media have exploded in recent years. However, have the fundamental components of the messages themselves also changed? What about ethical argument methods and structures--have they changed, too? Finally, what might we learn about digital arguments, for instance, from Aristotle’s classic On Rhetoric? Such questions will guide our work this semester as we investigate the ways humans use (and misuse) symbols, like language, to influence others in the 21st century. 

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetoric of the Body
Prof. Mayra Cano
WR 13300-05 / MWF 11:30 to 12:20

Everyone has a body; however, how might our bodies inform and dictate our different experiences? This course will examine rhetorical approaches to the body as a means of addressing larger issues regarding analysis, research, and argumentation. Utilizing various understandings of the body, we will read the body as a text to consider how the body acts as a persuasive and powerful agent in our political, cultural, and global discourse. This consideration of the body will allow us to examine and investigate the various intersections of identity, popular culture, and politics to unpack, expand, and challenge our own worldviews. Throughout the semester, these understanding of the body will lead us to develop critical thinking skills, research skills, and revision skills that will expand our writing abilities and world views beyond the limitations of our bodily experiences. 

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Jake Schepers
WR 13300-06 / MWF 12:50 to 1:40

Media theorist Marshall McLuhan once claimed that “Failure in perception occurs precisely in giving attention to the program 'content' of our media while ignoring the form.” More succinctly, he believed, “The medium is the message.” This course will tackle the implications behind this “failure” of perception. At the same time, it will equip students with critical tact to increase their awareness of how they engage with different forms of multimedia rhetoric both as consumers and as producers.

Over the semester, we will develop a better understanding of rhetorical basics, and we will ask ourselves in what ways our rhetorical situation has changed and/or remained the same in a digital world. We will analyze the choices and ethical responsibilities involved in creating an argument – such as voice, purpose, audience, and evidence – and we will put these considerations into practice in the forms of an audio narrative, a persuasion essay, a research paper, a media analysis, and a final portfolio, along with ongoing Sakai posts responding to class discussion and assigned readings. 

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric: Our Digital Selves
Prof. Joel Kempff
WR 13300-07 / TR 9:30 to 10:45

The ways we communicate with one another have always been various and evolving. But now, more than ever, we are presented with myriad mediums of expression. No longer are we confined to text on a page or in-person public address. Now, we compose arguments and present them via email, tweet, video conference, YouTube, Instagram, or TikTok—the mediums are many, and their ability to reach massive audiences grows greater every day. And, because we are so often behind keyboards and screens, we are offered the unprecedented opportunity to not only carefully craft our arguments, but also to carefully craft our digital identity. Understanding how we compose our digital selves is a vital part of understanding how we present arguments in the 21st century. As a multimedia focused course, we will identify, analyze, and ultimately craft rhetorical arguments across a range of media. We will combine the scholarship of rhetoric and ethical argumentation with material from various popular mediums in order to interrogate how the methods and structures of classical rhetoric and ethics continue to inform the way we consume and create arguments for this digital millennium. Throughout the semester we will consider how to construct not only ethical digital arguments but also ethical digital selves. 

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Jake Schepers
WR 13300-08 / MWF 10:30 to 11:20

Media theorist Marshall McLuhan once claimed that “Failure in perception occurs precisely in giving attention to the program 'content' of our media while ignoring the form.” More succinctly, he believed, “The medium is the message.” This course will tackle the implications behind this “failure” of perception. At the same time, it will equip students with critical tact to increase their awareness of how they engage with different forms of multimedia rhetoric both as consumers and as producers.

Over the semester, we will develop a better understanding of rhetorical basics, and we will ask ourselves in what ways our rhetorical situation has changed and/or remained the same in a digital world. We will analyze the choices and ethical responsibilities involved in creating an argument – such as voice, purpose, audience, and evidence – and we will put these considerations into practice in the forms of an audio narrative, a persuasion essay, a research paper, a media analysis, and a final portfolio, along with ongoing Sakai posts responding to class discussion and assigned readings. 

WR 13400: Advanced Writing and Rhetoric

Advanced Writing and Rhetoric 
Prof. Erin McLaughlin
WR 13400-01 / MWF 12:50 to 1:40

Advanced Writing and Rhetoric is designed to help students continue refining the interpretive, analytical, and composing skills developed through 1) attendance in WR 13100 or 2) a qualifying AP or IB score consistent with university policies. Students will practice composing in multiple genres and modalities, conducting original and secondary research, analyzing audiences, writing claims, providing evidence, addressing alternative perspectives, and revising written materials. The course will devote special attention to writing ethical arguments grounded in rhetorical practices of truthfulness, accountability, open-mindedness, and intellectual integrity. 

Advanced Writing and Rhetoric 
Prof. John Duffy
WR 13400-02 / TR 12:30 to 1:45

Advanced Writing and Rhetoric is designed to help students continue refining the interpretive, analytical, and composing skills developed through 1) attendance in WR 13100 or 2) a qualifying AP or IB score consistent with university policies. Students will practice composing in multiple genres and modalities, conducting original and secondary research, analyzing audiences, writing claims, providing evidence, addressing alternative perspectives, and revising written materials. The course will devote special attention to writing ethical arguments grounded in rhetorical practices of truthfulness, accountability, open-mindedness, and intellectual integrity.