Spring 2020 Courses

WR 12250: Deepening Critical Thought

Prof. Prof. Damian Zurro
WR 12250: Critical Conversations and Revision in the Disciplines 

Sections 01 & 02 / Days and Times TBD

Students enrolled in Deepening Critical Thought will have completed or be concurrently enrolled in Writing and Rhetoric 13100, 13200, or 13300. WR 12100 helps students apply rigorous reading and writing strategies in the context of challenging courses across the disciplines. Consisting of two weekly one-on-one sessions and one weekly small-group instruction session, this course offers intensive practice and guidance at all steps of the writing process. However, lessons will specifically focus on developing students’ skill and confidence in the areas of critical thinking, professor-student interaction, and a variety of revision practices, including lessons on how to apply professor feedback. Enrollment by departmental approval.

Prof. Prof. Nicole MacLaughlin
WR 12250: Critical Conversations and Revision in the Disciplines
Sections 03 & 04 / Days and Times TBD

Students enrolled in Deepening Critical Thought will have completed or be concurrently enrolled in Writing and Rhetoric 13100, 13200, or 13300. WR 12100 helps students apply rigorous reading and writing strategies in the context of challenging courses across the disciplines. Consisting of two weekly one-on-one sessions and one weekly small-group instruction session, this course offers intensive practice and guidance at all steps of the writing process. However, lessons will specifically focus on developing students’ skill and confidence in the areas of critical thinking, professor-student interaction, and a variety of revision practices, including lessons on how to apply professor feedback. Enrollment by departmental approval.

WR 12300: Advanced Writing and Rhetoric Tutorial

Prof. Nicole MacLaughlin 
WR 12300-01 / Days and Times TBD

Students enrolled in WR 12300 will have completed or be concurrently enrolled in Writing and Rhetoric 13100, 13200, or 13300. This course will offer strategies for successful written and verbal communication in the English academic context. Students will learn critical thinking practices, developing their capacity for thinking like a scholar in the context of different disciplines. Consisting of one weekly one-on-one instruction session and one weekly guided small-group session, this course helps students to develop an awareness of their strengths and weaknesses and to realize their potential as academic writers. Enrollment by departmental approval.

Prof. Damian Zurro
WR 12300-02 / Days and Times TBD

Students enrolled in WR 12300 will have completed or be concurrently enrolled in Writing and Rhetoric 13100, 13200, or 13300. This course will offer strategies for successful written and verbal communication in the English academic context. Students will learn critical thinking practices, developing their capacity for thinking like a scholar in the context of different disciplines. Consisting of one weekly one-on-one instruction session and one weekly guided small-group session, this course helps students to develop an awareness of their strengths and weaknesses and to realize their potential as academic writers. Enrollment by departmental approval.

WR 12350: Setting SMART Goals

Prof. Damian Zurro 
WR 12350-01 / Days and Times TBD

Consisting of weekly one-on-one sessions, this course offers intensive practice and guidance at all steps of the writing process. SMART Goals in the Writing Process offers students guidance, support, and individual instruction as they seek to set and reach goals to improve as writers. Students will learn to set and make a plan for goals that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and timely for their individual improvement as writers, students, and people. In addition, students will receive guidance and specialized instruction in reading, writing, and thinking strategies to assist them in the realization of their goals. Enrollment by departmental approval.

Prof. Nicole MacLaughlin
WR 12350-02 / Days and Times TBD

Consisting of weekly one-on-one sessions, this course offers intensive practice and guidance at all steps of the writing process. SMART Goals in the Writing Process offers students guidance, support, and individual instruction as they seek to set and reach goals to improve as writers. Students will learn to set and make a plan for goals that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and timely for their individual improvement as writers, students, and people. In addition, students will receive guidance and specialized instruction in reading, writing, and thinking strategies to assist them in the realization of their goals. Enrollment by departmental approval.

WR 13100: Writing and Rhetoric

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetorics of the Digital
Prof. Nathaniel Myers
WR 13100-01 / TR 2:00 to 3:15

Is it possible that, by the time you finish college, a machine will be able to write essays better than you, your classmates, and your professors? Well, not likely for any of us--and yet, we live in a world where this situation doesn't seem outside the realm of possibility. Already it is clear that our digital world exerts a powerful effect on us, such that we seem as much tools of our computers and iPhones as they are tools for us. We live our lives through an Instagram filter, in the 140-character tweet, and with a 10-second Snapchat video. In this course, we will consider the rhetorics of our digital world and the literacies (visual, digital, information) we require to negotiate that world, literacies we are already, however unwittingly, quite skilled in. Alongside text-based scholarship, we will draw on film, video essays, and other media platforms to formulate our own claims, discussion, and writing around topics like new media, information literacy and "post-truth" culture, and digital-born composition and argumentation. Assignments will include a visual analysis paper, a research paper focusing on the aforementioned topics, and a final assignment that integrates personal narrative with digital-born argument. 

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Jessica Shumake
WR 13100-02 / TR 12:30 to 1:45

In this course you will practice inquiry, reflection, invention, and revision. You will learn how to use stylistic conventions for a variety of situations, recognize established and emergent argument forms, offer evidence, evaluate information sources, and consider alternative perspectives. Throughout the semester you will select an audience, purpose, and context for the questions you ask and the provisional answers you offer. Questions concerning the obligations writers have to their readers and speakers have to their listeners will enable you to distinguish better from worse practices for ethical communication with your intended audience.

By the end of the course, you will be able to field questions such as: What are the uses of rhetoric? What must one know to create meaning and achieve one's purpose in specific contexts? How do I incorporate research and others' interpretations into my writing? What are best practices for evaluating digital information? Finally, we will engage with the questions that emerge when analyzing and evaluating different styles of writing and different ways of structuring an argument, which pulls in some or all of the habits of mind that are at the heart of studying what it means to write well and to practice ethical inquiry. 

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Matthew Capdevielle
WR 13100-03 / TR 9:30 to 10:45

What is the difference between manipulating and convincing someone? Is there anyone with whom we share no common ground? To what degree are we bound to respond to others? These are ethical questions: by their very nature they entail a consideration of our relations with others. And our relations with others take shape in language. This studio/workshop course seeks to explore the ethical issues of reasoned dialogue with special emphasis on persuasion. It is a course in argument as a way of reasoning with others by advancing claims and supporting them with evidence. Through a series of papers and seminar discussions, we will work to see how academic argument is more than just staking out a position and supporting it; argument involves understanding the different ways that issues may be viewed by members of different audiences and communities. In order to gain this perspective, we will work, as Aristotle tells us, to "see the available means of persuasion" in any given situation. This is the art of rhetoric. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetoric, Ethics, and Cultural Community
Prof. Elizabeth Capdevielle
WR 13100-04 / MWF 12:50 to 1:40

This writing studio course includes guided discussions, intensive workshops, extensive drafting processes, and one-on-one conferences with the professor, all designed to help students sharpen their rhetorical skills and put them to good use in university-level academic writing. Student professionalism is essential in this fun, challenging, and highly focused collaborative environment, as we study the messages that shape our culture today. Assignments and discussions address a wide variety of topics, from politics to commercial advertising to science. Each student completes a major research paper project, developing an original question on a topic that suits his or her own interests and values, while becoming comfortable using an academic research library. Along with taking a leadership role in discussion, each student also practices public speaking by presenting original research in a formal talk. We complete the course with final reflections on rhetoric and ethics in our cultural communities. 

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Jessica Shumake
WR 13100-05 / TR 11:00 to 12:15

In this course you will practice inquiry, reflection, invention, and revision. You will learn how to use stylistic conventions for a variety of situations, recognize established and emergent argument forms, offer evidence, evaluate information sources, and consider alternative perspectives. Throughout the semester you will select an audience, purpose, and context for the questions you ask and the provisional answers you offer. Questions concerning the obligations writers have to their readers and speakers have to their listeners will enable you to distinguish better from worse practices for ethical communication with your intended audience.

By the end of the course, you will be able to field questions such as: What are the uses of rhetoric? What must one know to create meaning and achieve one's purpose in specific contexts? How do I incorporate research and others' interpretations into my writing? What are best practices for evaluating digital information? Finally, we will engage with the questions that emerge when analyzing and evaluating different styles of writing and different ways of structuring an argument, which pulls in some or all of the habits of mind that are at the heart of studying what it means to write well and to practice ethical inquiry.  

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetoric, Ethics, and Cultural Community
Prof. Elizabeth Capdevielle
WR 13100-06 / MWF 11:30 to 12:20

This writing studio course includes guided discussions, intensive workshops, extensive drafting processes, and one-on-one conferences with the professor, all designed to help students sharpen their rhetorical skills and put them to good use in university-level academic writing. Student professionalism is essential in this fun, challenging, and highly focused collaborative environment, as we study the messages that shape our culture today. Assignments and discussions address a wide variety of topics, from politics to commercial advertising to science. Each student completes a major research paper project, developing an original question on a topic that suits his or her own interests and values, while becoming comfortable using an academic research library. Along with taking a leadership role in discussion, each student also practices public speaking by presenting original research in a formal talk. We complete the course with final reflections on rhetoric and ethics in our cultural communities. 

Writing and Rhetoric 
Prof. Talisha Haltiwanger Morrison
WR 13100-07 / TR 3:30 to 4:45

This course takes a rhetorical approach to analysis, research, and argumentation. In it we will consider stakeholders as a way to study issues from multiple perspectives, acknowledging that there are more than two sides to a story and considering how a story may change depending on who is telling it and when. It takes a listening approach to argumentation by insisting on listening to and hearing a conversation in order to understand before entering into it. Throughout the semester, we will look closely at issues that affect the local Notre Dame/ South Bend community and apply a rhetorical lens that allows us to examine the rhetorical situation, the author/speaker's purpose, audience, exigence, and context. We will think about the author's own biases, his/her/their audiences', and our own. The rhetorical consideration of stakeholders allows us to more fully understand and develop effective, ethical, and well-reasoned arguments. 

Writing and Rhetoric: The Personal, Popular, and Political
Prof. Abigail Burns
WR 13100-08 / MWF 8:20 to 9:10

In 2014, a dress broke the internet. Across social media, people became absurdly invested in a debate over whether this dress was white and gold or blue and black. While the image and subsequent conflict gradually faded from our public discourse, it first became a locus through which people began to question and understand what has since been called the “Post-Truth” era, where individuals’ subjective realities have allegedly diverged so radically that we can no longer even agree on “objective” facts. In this class, we will begin to investigate the various intersections of experience, identity, popular culture, and politics to unpack, understand, and perhaps expand our own worldviews. Through this investigation, students will build upon their critical thinking, writing, and research skills with the hope of proving the cynics wrong as we actively engage in informed and ethical public discourse. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Environmental Rhetoric
Prof. Jake McGinnis
WR 13100-09 / TR 9:30 to 10:45

In recent years, environmental debates in the United States have often been starkly polarized and entirely uncompromising—an endless battle of “us” versus “them.”  Is ethical persuasion still possible across social, political, and cultural divides? What does virtuous rhetoric look like today, and how does it work? In this course, we’ll study written, oral, and visual arguments in contemporary and historical environmental debates to reassess what argumentation is and how it might help us as students across the disciplines and citizens of the world.  We’ll read essays, watch a few short films, and explore photography as a representation of the “real.” Your work as a student will include a research paper on a topic related to the course, as well as three shorter essays that build on class discussions and regular in-class writing. At the end, you’ll get to decide for yourself—is argument still an important part of twenty-first-century political and civil life, or should we radically rethink the ways in which we communicate in college and beyond

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Jessica Shumake
WR 13100-10 / TR 2:00 to 3:15

In this course you will practice inquiry, reflection, invention, and revision. You will learn how to use stylistic conventions for a variety of situations, recognize established and emergent argument forms, offer evidence, evaluate information sources, and consider alternative perspectives. Throughout the semester you will select an audience, purpose, and context for the questions you ask and the provisional answers you offer. Questions concerning the obligations writers have to their readers and speakers have to their listeners will enable you to distinguish better from worse practices for ethical communication with your intended audience.

By the end of the course, you will be able to field questions such as: What are the uses of rhetoric? What must one know to create meaning and achieve one's purpose in specific contexts? How do I incorporate research and others' interpretations into my writing? What are best practices for evaluating digital information? Finally, we will engage with the questions that emerge when analyzing and evaluating different styles of writing and different ways of structuring an argument, which pulls in some or all of the habits of mind that are at the heart of studying what it means to write well and to practice ethical inquiry. 

Writing and Rhetoric: The Call to Write
Prof. Joanna Want
WR 13100-11 / MWF 10:30 to 11:20

What do an Instagram post, philosophy paper, obituary, commencement speech, yelp review, lab report, and college application essay have in common? They are all genres of writing with a particular set of conventions that guide both readers and writers. Most of us write every day for a variety of purposes: academic, social, or professional. In each case, we answer a “call to write,” which may originate from external demands or from an internally felt desire to communicate with others and change situations we care about. Using genre, rhetorical situation, and rhetorical virtues as guiding concepts, we’ll build upon your previous knowledge as we craft a framework for successfully navigating writing situations at the university and beyond. To this end, we’ll study instances when writers have effectively responded to the call to write in ways powerful, creative, or unconventional. Throughout the semester, you will compose in a variety of genres intended to persuade and influence others. By semester’s end, you will have gained a better understanding of what you, as a resourceful and ethical writer, can accomplish when you answer the call to write. *Students in this section will attend an evening performance of Show Some Skin at DPAC

Writing and Rhetoric: Fake News and Free Speech
Prof. Kurt McGee
WR 13100-12 / TR 12:30 to 1:45

Rhetoric involves the ways in which we persuade others (and ourselves) that something is the case. It is a creative yet regimented form of art as relevant today during crises of fake news and free speech as it was to its Ancient Greek inventors. In this class I intend to arm you with the necessary ideas and practical skills to recognize the persuasiveness all around you and to construct your own thoughtful arguments in pursuit of the truth. Our syllabus will include regular readings, a few smaller papers, a presentation, and a final research paper that will ask you to argue a particular idea at length. Throughout the semester we will read about the philosophy and ethics behind free speech, investigate how to find truthful news sources and sort through "fake news," learn how to edit and find bias in websites such as Wikipedia, and develop solid writing skills to put our thoughts in coherent form. Ultimately our goals are to become more competent writers, more sympathetic classmates and colleagues, and more tolerant but assertive citizens of a world always trying to persuade us. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetorics of the Digital
Prof. Nathaniel Myers
WR 13100-13 / TR 3:30 to 4:45

Is it possible that, by the time you finish college, a machine will be able to write essays better than you, your classmates, and your professors? Well, not likely for any of us--and yet, we live in a world where this situation doesn't seem outside the realm of possibility. Already it is clear that our digital world exerts a powerful effect on us, such that we seem as much tools of our computers and iPhones as they are tools for us. We live our lives through an Instagram filter, in the 140-character tweet, and with a 10-second Snapchat video. In this course, we will consider the rhetorics of our digital world and the literacies (visual, digital, information) we require to negotiate that world, literacies we are already, however unwittingly, quite skilled in. Alongside text-based scholarship, we will draw on film, video essays, and other media platforms to formulate our own claims, discussion, and writing around topics like new media, information literacy and "post-truth" culture, and digital-born composition and argumentation. Assignments will include a visual analysis paper, a research paper focusing on the aforementioned topics, and a final assignment that integrates personal narrative with digital-born argument. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetorics of the Digital
Prof. Nathaniel Myers
WR 13100-14 / TR 11:00 to 12:15 

Is it possible that, by the time you finish college, a machine will be able to write essays better than you, your classmates, and your professors? Well, not likely for any of us--and yet, we live in a world where this situation doesn't seem outside the realm of possibility. Already it is clear that our digital world exerts a powerful effect on us, such that we seem as much tools of our computers and iPhones as they are tools for us. We live our lives through an Instagram filter, in the 140-character tweet, and with a 10-second Snapchat video. In this course, we will consider the rhetorics of our digital world and the literacies (visual, digital, information) we require to negotiate that world, literacies we are already, however unwittingly, quite skilled in. Alongside text-based scholarship, we will draw on film, video essays, and other media platforms to formulate our own claims, discussion, and writing around topics like new media, information literacy and "post-truth" culture, and digital-born composition and argumentation. Assignments will include a visual analysis paper, a research paper focusing on the aforementioned topics, and a final assignment that integrates personal narrative with digital-born argument. 

Writing and Rhetoric: The Call to Write 
Prof. Joanna Lin Want
WR 13100-15 / MWF 12:50 to 1:40

What do an Instagram post, philosophy paper, obituary, commencement speech, yelp review, lab report, and college application essay have in common? They are all genres of writing with a particular set of conventions that guide both readers and writers. Most of us write every day for a variety of purposes: academic, social, or professional. In each case, we answer a “call to write,” which may originate from external demands or from an internally felt desire to communicate with others and change situations we care about. Using genre, rhetorical situation, and rhetorical virtues as guiding concepts, we’ll build upon your previous knowledge as we craft a framework for successfully navigating writing situations at the university and beyond. To this end, we’ll study instances when writers have effectively responded to the call to write in ways powerful, creative, or unconventional. Throughout the semester, you will compose in a variety of genres intended to persuade and influence others. By semester’s end, you will have gained a better understanding of what you, as a resourceful and ethical writer, can accomplish when you answer the call to write. *Students in this section will attend an evening performance of Show Some Skin at DPAC

Writing and Rhetoric: The Call to Write
Prof. Joanna Lin Want
WR 13100-16 / MWF 11:30 to 12:20

What do an Instagram post, philosophy paper, obituary, commencement speech, yelp review, lab report, and college application essay have in common? They are all genres of writing with a particular set of conventions that guide both readers and writers. Most of us write every day for a variety of purposes: academic, social, or professional. In each case, we answer a “call to write,” which may originate from external demands or from an internally felt desire to communicate with others and change situations we care about. Using genre, rhetorical situation, and rhetorical virtues as guiding concepts, we’ll build upon your previous knowledge as we craft a framework for successfully navigating writing situations at the university and beyond. To this end, we’ll study instances when writers have effectively responded to the call to write in ways powerful, creative, or unconventional. Throughout the semester, you will compose in a variety of genres intended to persuade and influence others. By semester’s end, you will have gained a better understanding of what you, as a resourceful and ethical writer, can accomplish when you answer the call to write. *Students in this section will attend an evening performance of Show Some Skin at DPAC.  

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Talisha Haltiwanger Morrison
WR 13100-17 / TR 2:00 to 3:15

This course takes a rhetorical approach to analysis, research, and argumentation. In it we will consider stakeholders as a way to study issues from multiple perspectives, acknowledging that there are more than two sides to a story and considering how a story may change depending on who is telling it and when. It takes a listening approach to argumentation by insisting on listening to and hearing a conversation in order to understand before entering into it. Throughout the semester, we will look closely at issues that affect the local Notre Dame/ South Bend community and apply a rhetorical lens that allows us to examine the rhetorical situation, the author/speaker's purpose, audience, exigence, and context. We will think about the author's own biases, his/her/their audiences', and our own. The rhetorical consideration of stakeholders allows us to more fully understand and develop effective, ethical, and well-reasoned arguments. 

Writing and Rhetoric: The Personal, Popular, and Political
Prof. Abigail Burns
WR 13100-18 / MWF 9:25 to 10:15

In 2014, a dress broke the internet. Across social media, people became absurdly invested in a debate over whether this dress was white and gold or blue and black. While the image and subsequent conflict gradually faded from our public discourse, it first became a locus through which people began to question and understand what has since been called the “Post-Truth” era, where individuals’ subjective realities have allegedly diverged so radically that we can no longer even agree on “objective” facts. In this class, we will begin to investigate the various intersections of experience, identity, popular culture, and politics to unpack, understand, and perhaps expand our own worldviews. Through this investigation, students will build upon their critical thinking, writing, and research skills with the hope of proving the cynics wrong as we actively engage in informed and ethical public discourse. 

Writing and Rhetoric: The Personal, Popular, and Political
Prof. Abigail Burns
WR 13100-19 / MWF 10:30 to 11:20

In 2014, a dress broke the internet. Across social media, people became absurdly invested in a debate over whether this dress was white and gold or blue and black. While the image and subsequent conflict gradually faded from our public discourse, it first became a locus through which people began to question and understand what has since been called the “Post-Truth” era, where individuals’ subjective realities have allegedly diverged so radically that we can no longer even agree on “objective” facts. In this class, we will begin to investigate the various intersections of experience, identity, popular culture, and politics to unpack, understand, and perhaps expand our own worldviews. Through this investigation, students will build upon their critical thinking, writing, and research skills with the hope of proving the cynics wrong as we actively engage in informed and ethical public discourse. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Ethical Discourse Across Media
Prof. Kasey Swanke
WR 13100-20 / MWF 11:30 to 12:20

Albus Dumbledore remarked that "words are our most inexhaustible source of magic--capable of both inflicting injury and remedying it." Every day we encounter words and arguments, some of which are injurious to discourse and some of which promote peace, fairness, and dialogue. Focusing on issues of contemporary and ethical significance, we will learn how to use words, images, sounds, and other forms of media to persuade others in ways that serve ourselves and our audiences.

This course prepares you for writing successfully in your current and future courses at Notre Dame. Each class that you take here will introduce you to specific conversations regarding topics of moral, political, scientific, and intellectual significance. Thinking about them often requires qualifications, trade-offs, and excruciating honesty. Navigating and responding to them well requires a keen understanding of argumentation and presentation tactics. While we develop a diverse rhetorical toolkit and strategies for successful writing, our multimodal focus will lend us the advantage of sharpening these portable skills across media spanning commercial advertisements, film, and scholarly journal articles, to name just a few

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetoric of the Everyday
Prof. Jennifer Thorup
WR 13100-21 / TR 12:30 to 1:45

You are a writer, and you encounter writing every single day. From the post-it note on the fridge informing your roommate that you accidentally ate her plums, the music lyrics stuck in your head driving to work, the memo you sent your co-worker regarding your upcoming project, to the Facebook comment you just made on that hilarious sheep-fainting video—you are writing and engaging in rhetorical situations daily. The goal of this Writing and Rhetoric course is to provide you the rhetorical tools you need to feel confident about writing both inside the classroom and out in the "real world." Our focus is teaching you to use rhetoric ethically and responsibly, to critically read texts, to write more coherent and enjoyable prose, and be a better human while doing it. While our assignments will be primarily written essays, the rhetorical arguments we’ll engage with will include things you encounter daily (music, visual images, newspaper headlines, conversations, love letters, etc.). The truth is, we become better writers by writing and being mindful in the process. You are a writer—so let’s get writing. 

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Anila Shree
WR 13100-22 / MWF 12:50 to 1:40

In the current moment, when it is easy to offend, how does one correctly wield humor as a tool of critique? The purpose of the course will be to evaluate humor’s varied possibilities and limitations as a rhetorical tool, its relevance to interpersonal communication, political consciousness, and writer/reader relations. Humor is usually understood as a useful supplement to argumentation for comic relief. But what happens when humor becomes the primary form of rhetorical argumentation? If the purpose of rhetoric is to persuade, how does one tread the fine line that divides humor as a tool of analysis from humor used to render something trivial? What are the ethical consequences of laughing at something? The course will not only look at short prose pieces, current op-eds, but also cartoon strips (for instance Calvin and Hobbes), stand-up comedy, and memes. Students will learn how to gauge rhetorical situations, use humor for rhetorical analysis/argumentation while also developing the skills to understand the role of humor in the works of others and across varied media. Assignments will include a combination of short writing pieces, an 8-10 page research paper connected with the topic, and an option to substitute a smaller piece with a self-designed cartoon strip or a creative humorous piece. 

Writing and Rhetoric: The Rhetoric of "All the Things!"
Prof. Kristen Carlson
WR 13100-23 / MWF 9:25 to 10:15

What do bicycles, smartphones, minerals, and grocery aisles have to do with rhetoric? To answer this question, this class will approach objects as rhetorical "texts" that act as powerful, persuasive agents in our political, cultural, ecological, and global discourse. For example, how do a bicycle’s aesthetics influence gender constructs? How does the design of grocery aisles facilitate consumer behavior? When we challenge the assumption that objects are simply inert tools, we will uncover the secret life of the things that pervade our lives.

Throughout the semester, we will encounter the rhetorical power of things like technology, scientific tools, fashion items, cultural artifacts, built environments, and visual art. In the words of the popular meme, we will think about the rhetoric of "all the things!" Thinking through "things" will allow us to carefully consider multiple perspectives and ethically engage in the critical conversations that dominate our world. In the process, we will build essential tools for constructing persuasive and compelling arguments in a variety of rhetorical situations and digital media. 

Writing and Rhetoric: What We Talk About When We Talk About Games
Prof. Nick Mainieri 
WR 13100-24 / TR 3:30 to 4:45

"Playing a game," philosopher Bernard Suits has argued, "is the voluntary attempt to overcome unnecessary obstacles." One might find it curious, then, that we spend so much of our lives playing or watching games, let alone the time we devote to thinking and arguing about them. This course asks you to generate conscientious, ethical arguments about your world, and draws its readings, class discussions, and opportunities for original research from the scholarly (and sometimes popular) conversations surrounding video games, board games, athletics, and anything in between. It is important to note that this is not a games class, per se. Rather, you will consider questions presented by games’ profound cultural influence as a means toward engaging with contemporary scholarly and issues-based conversations. Through completing several formal writing assignments, you will analyze specific rhetorical texts and/or contexts, and practice the artful and ethical applications of argument and persuasion. 

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Claudia Carroll
WR 13100-25 / TR 5:05 to 6:20

In the 21st century, our day-to-day lives are saturated with rhetorical tasks: convincing a university advisor that you should take a certain class, telling a story in a way that makes your friends laugh, interviewing for a job. All of these experiences require us to present ourselves and our position in certain ways, in order to achieve certain effects on our audiences, which will in turn, hopefully, lead to desires or ambitions being fulfilled. By working through a variety of examples of rhetoric in practice, including political speeches, trial defenses, and YouTube videos, we will consider how we can persuade people of something, but also the ethical responsibilities of the power of persuasion. Assignments to this end will include short weekly writing tasks and a final research paper. This class is primarily geared toward training you to become effective writers in a university context; however the rhetorical skills you will come to understand and deploy over the course of the semester will allow you to better understand how you already communicate, and make that communication more effective. 

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Ian Gerdon
WR 13100-26 / MWF 9:25 to 10:15

Can people change their minds? Can they find common ground? Why would they bother to try? From Aristotle to George Washington to the study of 20th century totalitarianism, we find a similar theme: when people can’t or won’t talk to each other, violence and tyranny are on the horizon. Without dialogue and the trust that makes it possible, self-governance and a meaningful search for truth may be doomed. So how does dialogue work, how does persuasion work, and what kind of people do we need to be to make them work?

In this class, we will consider why we communicate and what standards and goals guide our efforts to communicate effectively as well as ethically. In the process, we will examine how to read and write as forms of dialogue, how Aristotle’s theory of persuasion can illuminate our public discourse, how persuasion differs from propaganda, and what the barriers to and possibilities of dialogue are today, as well as how we can tell stories that are both true and meaningful. We’ll take our lead from philosophy, literature, art, politics, and religion. In the end, hopefully, we’ll emerge as better students, citizens, and human beings—as well as better writers. 

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Ian Gerdon
WR 13100-27 / MWF 10:30 to 11:20

Can people change their minds? Can they find common ground? Why would they bother to try? From Aristotle to George Washington to the study of 20th century totalitarianism, we find a similar theme: when people can’t or won’t talk to each other, violence and tyranny are on the horizon. Without dialogue and the trust that makes it possible, self-governance and a meaningful search for truth may be doomed. So how does dialogue work, how does persuasion work, and what kind of people do we need to be to make them work?

In this class, we will consider why we communicate and what standards and goals guide our efforts to communicate effectively as well as ethically. In the process, we will examine how to read and write as forms of dialogue, how Aristotle’s theory of persuasion can illuminate our public discourse, how persuasion differs from propaganda, and what the barriers to and possibilities of dialogue are today, as well as how we can tell stories that are both true and meaningful. We’ll take our lead from philosophy, literature, art, politics, and religion. In the end, hopefully, we’ll emerge as better students, citizens, and human beings—as well as better writers.

Writing and Rhetoric: A Classical Approach
Prof. Dong Hwan (Alex) Chun
WR 13100-26 / MWF 2:00 to 2:50

For the ancient Athenians, the art of rhetoric was deeply intertwined with their identity as free citizens. Considering that modern democracy originated from this ancient polis, it is more than fitting for a modern citizen living in a democratic society to be well acquainted with the discipline. In this course, students will be invited to read some of the major classical writings on rhetoric and to examine its role in one of the earliest democratic civilizations. These exercises will assist students in defining for themselves what it means to be a citizen in a 21st-century democracy and how the study of rhetoric could contribute to the active performance of civic responsibilities. This will require, above all, students to master rhetorical virtues and ethical rhetoric. As rhetoric is an art of language, it is to be introduced and approached mainly through the means of reading and, more importantly, writing. Students will be encouraged to read and think both rigorously and critically. With a wide variety of materials to consider, students will gain confidence through productive imitation and then eventually find their own voices. They will be given ample opportunities to express their findings through diverse writing exercises and intellectually stimulating discussionsourse description coming soon.

WR 13200: Community-Based Writing and Rhetoric

Community-Based Writing and Rhetoric: Nature and the Community
Prof. Elizabeth Capdevielle
WR 13200-01 / MWF 9:25 to 10:15

In this sustainability-focused Writing & Rhetoric course, you’ll spend some time outdoors, refine your ways of thinking and communicating about society and the environment, and enjoy new relationships and experiential learning through service in our local South Bend community. In a unique combination of sustainability work and tutoring, we will assist with a program that gives urban youth the opportunity to explore nature through visits to a local permaculture farm and conservation organization, followed by journaling and essay writing about their experiences. In a given week, you should expect to spend your time in several different types of activity. You’ll do traditional homework like reading academic and literary articles, drafting papers, and revising your own writing as you prepare for discussion of rhetorical texts and concepts in our ND classroom. But you’ll also spend some of your time outside of class in non-traditional ways, such as working outdoors in a farmyard, prairie, wetland, or woods, and working at a community center as a tutor and discussion partner to a middle school or high school student. These core service experiences will shape our discussions of rhetoric and writing, as we analyze texts that send certain messages about environmentalism, social responsibility, identity, and community. You will develop college-level research and writing skills through essay and presentation assignments that help you shape your own ethos as a member of both the university community and the wider community beyond our campus boundaries. 

WR 13300: Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric: Identity, Community, and Ethical Argument in a Digital Age 
Prof. Erin McLaughlin
WR 13300-01 / MWF 11:30 to 12:20

This course is an introduction to rhetoric, writing, and research. As a multimedia-focused course, we will identify, analyze, and compose arguments across a variety of media. Our reading and writing efforts this semester will center on the role of identity and community values in argumentation. Drawing from a variety of scholarly and popular source material, we will explore how key dimensions of digital culture shape the way we experience and react to arguments in a digital age. Throughout these discussions, we will give special attention to ethical virtues of argumentation and the form those virtues take across argumentative forms and contexts. 

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric: Identity, Community, and Ethical Argument in a Digital Age 
Prof. Erin McLaughlin
WR 13300-02 / MWF 10:30 to 11:20 

This course is an introduction to rhetoric, writing, and research. As a multimedia-focused course, we will identify, analyze, and compose arguments across a variety of media. Our reading and writing efforts this semester will center on the role of identity and community values in argumentation. Drawing from a variety of scholarly and popular source material, we will explore how key dimensions of digital culture shape the way we experience and react to arguments in a digital age. Throughout these discussions, we will give special attention to ethical virtues of argumentation and the form those virtues take across argumentative forms and contexts. 

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric: Identity, Community, and Ethical Argument in a Digital Age 
Prof. Erin McLaughlin
WR 13300-03 / MWF 9:25 to 10:15

This course is an introduction to rhetoric, writing, and research. As a multimedia-focused course, we will identify, analyze, and compose arguments across a variety of media. Our reading and writing efforts this semester will center on the role of identity and community values in argumentation. Drawing from a variety of scholarly and popular source material, we will explore how key dimensions of digital culture shape the way we experience and react to arguments in a digital age. Throughout these discussions, we will give special attention to ethical virtues of argumentation and the form those virtues take across argumentative forms and contexts. 

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetoric and Identity 
Prof. Shela Raman
WR 13300-04 / TR 11:00 to 12:15

The identities we craft for ourselves play a crucial role in how we understand ourselves and our place in the world—who we are, where we come from, and who we want to be. Whenever we write or express ourselves through various media, we produce an identity that both informs and is informed by the world around us. In this course, we will investigate the ways in which we create, communicate, and interpret our identities through rhetorical practices, and explore how the words and images we are confronted with every day shape the way we think about and relate to other people. Our primary focus will be how to navigate the rhetorical strategies of the digital age to both consume and produce arguments responsibly. Upon completing this course, students will understand academic and popular arguments as ethical activities, develop a rhetorical vocabulary for critiquing and composing multimedia arguments, and understand the collaborative and social aspects of the writing process. Along with traditional text-based papers, assignments incorporate a variety of modalities and media, including audio, video, blogs, photography, and infographics. 

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric: Digital Rhetoric and Ethics
Prof. Joshua Wright
WR 13300-05 / MWF 2:00 to 2:50

"Character is what you are in the dark," or so the old adage goes. It often seems that the glow of our screens has a similarly revealing effect. We live in an information-saturated age, one where the media we consume is more often than not filtered to us through our screens. In a moment when much of our discourse with one another occurs digitally through new media such as Tweets, YouTube videos, and Instagram posts, the question of how to effectively and ethically communicate our ideas to others has seldom been in more flux. In this course, students will learn how to construct effective and ethical rhetorical arguments, learning how to do so through the lens of the digital media environment we all live in today. Students will be asked to engage with a wide-variety of media in the process of learning various rhetorical techniques with the aim of ensuring a multi-modal literacy and ability to recognize and analyze the rhetoric that surrounds us in our digital environment. Assignments will include traditional essays and a final multimodal project that gives students the option of creating their own podcasts, videos, and so forth. In our discussions and assignments, we will emphasize the question of what it means to communicate in a rhetorically and ethically virtuous manner in a digital environment that so often brings out the worst in us. 

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric: Signal to Noise
Prof. Oliver Ortega
WR 13300-06 / MWF 2:00 to 2:50

Humans have the unique trait of creating and believing stories about how the world works. Dollar bills, for example, have no value outside our collective imagination, yet everyone believes in the value of money. Mass media in its various forms is perhaps the strongest conduit of such stories, informing how we see ourselves and the world around us. In this course we will look at how mass media, especially news reporting, informs how we buy into or reject certain narratives, such as the value of money. We will try to define and understand terms such as fake news, spin, propaganda, false equivalency, objectivity and what comedian Stephen Colbert calls “truthiness.” We will explore different rhetorical styles and appeals present in news, TV shows, movies, memes and other media. Expect daily readings and weekly forum responses, as well as a few short written assignments and a final research paper that will ask you to argue a particular idea at length. We will also dabble in audio and photography. Ultimately, the goal is to become critical consumers of information as well as ethical—even virtuous—producers of media. Such skills acquire even more importance at a time when the value of a free and independent media is constantly under question. 

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Partrick Clauss
WR 13300-07 / TR 2:00 to 3:15

In The Art of Travel, Alain de Botton observes that "a danger of travel is that we may see things at the wrong time, before we have had an opportunity to build up the necessary receptivity, so that new information is as useless and fugitive as necklace beads without a connecting chain.” The argument applies not only to travel in the literal sense, physically going from one location to another, but also travel in a metaphoric sense, the kind of travel a scholar might undertake while moving through a complex research and writing process.

How might one build up such a necessary receptivity, ensuring that new information and new experiences are not "useless and fugitive . . . without a connecting chain"? The study of rhetoric offers answers: Rhetoric—understood here as the science of argumentation (privileging logos) and the art of persuasion (privileging ethos and pathos)—trains one to be a skilled researcher, speaker, and writer. In the liberal arts tradition, the study of rhetoric also trains one in ways of knowing, of being receptive to how seemingly disparate information, old and new, fits together. Thus, in this course, we will cultivate our receptivity to the rhetorical worlds around us, all the while speaking and writing with integrity, compassion, and wisdom.

WR 13400: Advanced Writing and Rhetoric

Advanced Writing and Rhetoric 
Prof. Ian Gerdon
WR 13400-01 / MWF 9:25 to 10:15

Advanced Writing and Rhetoric is designed to help students continue refining the interpretive, analytical, and composing skills developed through 1) attendance in WR 13100 or 2) a qualifying AP or IB score consistent with university policies. Students will practice composing in multiple genres and modalities, conducting original and secondary research, analyzing audiences, writing claims, providing evidence, addressing alternative perspectives, and revising written materials. The course will devote special attention to writing ethical arguments grounded in rhetorical practices of truthfulness, accountability, open-mindedness, and intellectual integrity.