Spring 2021 Courses


WR 12000: Growing as a Writer

Critical Reading and Writing in the Disciplines
Prof. Nicole MacLaughlin
WR 12000-01 / Days and Times TBA

This course is an elective supplement to the three-credit Writing and Rhetoric or University Seminar course for first-year students. This second eight weeks course is designed for students who want to use the feedback they've gotten so far to improve their writing in the context of a specific course. They will synthesize feedback, identify objectives for growth, and develop a rigorous approach to planning, drafting, and revising essays. Students will receive individualized guidance as they implement feedback in the context of new writing assignments and revisions of previous assignments. One hour of instruction with a professor and one half-hour of instruction with an undergraduate teaching assistant will take place each week at mutually arranged times, TBD. This course is graded S/U.

Critical Reading and Writing in the Disciplines
Prof. Damian Zurro
WR 12000-02 / Days and Times TBA

This course is an elective supplement to the three-credit Writing and Rhetoric or University Seminar course for first-year students. This second eight weeks course is designed for students who want to use the feedback they've gotten so far to improve their writing in the context of a specific course. They will synthesize feedback, identify objectives for growth, and develop a rigorous approach to planning, drafting, and revising essays. Students will receive individualized guidance as they implement feedback in the context of new writing assignments and revisions of previous assignments. One hour of instruction with a professor and one half-hour of instruction with an undergraduate teaching assistant will take place each week at mutually arranged times, TBD. This course is graded S/U.

WR 12250: Writing and Rhetoric Tutorial

Critical Reading and Writing in the Disciplines
Prof. Damian Zurro
WR 12250-01 / Days and Times TBA

This Tutorial course is an elective supplement to a three-credit Writing and Rhetoric course, a University Seminar, or another writing-intensive course. Students will receive weekly individualized instruction as well as hands-on guidance in a studio setting as they approach their writing projects for writing-intensive courses. They will practice approaches to every step of the writing process, from understanding assignments to reading difficult texts to revising, editing, and growing from professor feedback. We'll learn to navigate the challenges of college writing, from managing workload to conquering procrastination and writer's block. Students will design a writing process that will help them to develop resilience and achieve academic growth. 50-minute individual instruction sessions and group studio sessions will take place weekly at mutually available times, TBD. 

Critical Reading and Writing in the Disciplines
Prof. Damian Zurro
WR 12250-02 / Days and Times TBA

This Tutorial course is an elective supplement to a three-credit Writing and Rhetoric course, a University Seminar, or another writing-intensive course. Students will receive weekly individualized instruction as well as hands-on guidance in a studio setting as they approach their writing projects for writing-intensive courses. They will practice approaches to every step of the writing process, from understanding assignments to reading difficult texts to revising, editing, and growing from professor feedback. We'll learn to navigate the challenges of college writing, from managing workload to conquering procrastination and writer's block. Students will design a writing process that will help them to develop resilience and achieve academic growth. 50-minute individual instruction sessions and group studio sessions will take place weekly at mutually available times, TBD. 

Critical Reading and Writing in the Disciplines
Prof. Nicole MacLaughlin
WR 12250-03 / Days and Times TBA

This Tutorial course is an elective supplement to a three-credit Writing and Rhetoric course, a University Seminar, or another writing-intensive course. Students will receive weekly individualized instruction as well as hands-on guidance in a studio setting as they approach their writing projects for writing-intensive courses. They will practice approaches to every step of the writing process, from understanding assignments to reading difficult texts to revising, editing, and growing from professor feedback. We'll learn to navigate the challenges of college writing, from managing workload to conquering procrastination and writer's block. Students will design a writing process that will help them to develop resilience and achieve academic growth. 50-minute individual instruction sessions and group studio sessions will take place weekly at mutually available times, TBD. 

Critical Reading and Writing in the Disciplines
Prof. Nicole MacLaughlin
WR 12250-04 / Days and Times TBA

This Tutorial course is an elective supplement to a three-credit Writing and Rhetoric course, a University Seminar, or another writing-intensive course. Students will receive weekly individualized instruction as well as hands-on guidance in a studio setting as they approach their writing projects for writing-intensive courses. They will practice approaches to every step of the writing process, from understanding assignments to reading difficult texts to revising, editing, and growing from professor feedback. We'll learn to navigate the challenges of college writing, from managing workload to conquering procrastination and writer's block. Students will design a writing process that will help them to develop resilience and achieve academic growth. 50-minute individual instruction sessions and group studio sessions will take place weekly at mutually available times, TBD. 

WR 12300: Advanced Writing and Rhetoric Tutorial

Critical Thinking and English Academic Writing
Prof. Nicole MacLaughlin
WR 12300-01 / Days and Times TBD

This Tutorial course should be taken as a companion to a three-credit Writing and Rhetoric course, a University Seminar, or another writing-intensive course. Students will receive weekly individualized instruction as they approach their writing projects for writing-intensive courses. They will practice approaches to every step of the writing process, from understanding assignments to growing from professor feedback. They will practice revision and editing as ways to deepen and clarify their own writing. Finally, they will learn strategies for navigating the challenges of college writing, from managing workload and time to conquering procrastination and writer's block. Students will leave the course having designed a writing process that will help them to achieve academic success and embrace growth. Fifty minutes of instruction with a professor will take place each week at mutually arranged times, TBD. 

Critical Thinking and English Academic Writing
Prof. Damian Zurro
WR 12300-02 / Days and Times TBD

This Tutorial course should be taken as a companion to a three-credit Writing and Rhetoric course, a University Seminar, or another writing-intensive course. Students will receive weekly individualized instruction as they approach their writing projects for writing-intensive courses. They will practice approaches to every step of the writing process, from understanding assignments to growing from professor feedback. They will practice revision and editing as ways to deepen and clarify their own writing. Finally, they will learn strategies for navigating the challenges of college writing, from managing workload and time to conquering procrastination and writer's block. Students will leave the course having designed a writing process that will help them to achieve academic success and embrace growth. Fifty minutes of instruction with a professor will take place each week at mutually arranged times, TBD. 

WR 12350: Setting SMART Goals

Advanced Writing Process
Prof. Damian Zurro
WR 12350-01 / Days and Times TBA

Students in this course will receive individualized instruction in the writing process, developing strategies for meeting the expectations of academic audiences beyond first-year undergraduate courses. They will learn to isolate and address problem areas in their writing process, to independently plan and manage their process, and to use goal-setting to challenge themselves to grow to the next level as writers. Fifty minutes of instruction with a professor will take place each week at mutually arranged times, TBD.

Advanced Writing Process
Prof. Nicole MacLaughlin
WR 12350-02 / Days and Times TBA

Students in this course will receive individualized instruction in the writing process, developing strategies for meeting the expectations of academic audiences beyond first-year undergraduate courses. They will learn to isolate and address problem areas in their writing process, to independently plan and manage their process, and to use goal-setting to challenge themselves to grow to the next level as writers. Fifty minutes of instruction with a professor will take place each week at mutually arranged times, TBD.

WR 13100: Writing and Rhetoric

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetorics of the Digital
Prof. Nathaniel Myers
WR 13100-01 / TR 2:20P to 3:35P

Is it possible that, by the time you finish college, a machine will be able to write essays better than you, your classmates, and your professors? Well, not likely for any of us--and yet, we live in a world where this situation doesn't seem outside the realm of possibility. Already it is clear that our digital world exerts a powerful effect on us, such that we seem as much tools of our computers and iPhones as they are tools for us. We live our lives through an Instagram filter, in the 140-character tweet, and with a 10-second Snapchat video. In this course, we will consider the rhetorics of our digital world and the literacies (visual, digital, information) we require to negotiate that world, literacies we are already, however unwittingly, quite skilled in. Alongside text-based scholarship, we will draw on film, video essays, and other media platforms to formulate our own claims, discussion, and writing around topics like new media, information literacy and "post-truth" culture, and digital-born composition and argumentation. Assignments will include a visual analysis paper, a research paper focusing on the aforementioned topics, and a final assignment that integrates personal narrative with digital-born argument.*Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetorics of the Digital
Prof. Nathaniel Myers
WR 13100-02 / TR 12:45P to 2:00P

Is it possible that, by the time you finish college, a machine will be able to write essays better than you, your classmates, and your professors? Well, not likely for any of us--and yet, we live in a world where this situation doesn't seem outside the realm of possibility. Already it is clear that our digital world exerts a powerful effect on us, such that we seem as much tools of our computers and iPhones as they are tools for us. We live our lives through an Instagram filter, in the 140-character tweet, and with a 10-second Snapchat video. In this course, we will consider the rhetorics of our digital world and the literacies (visual, digital, information) we require to negotiate that world, literacies we are already, however unwittingly, quite skilled in. Alongside text-based scholarship, we will draw on film, video essays, and other media platforms to formulate our own claims, discussion, and writing around topics like new media, information literacy and "post-truth" culture, and digital-born composition and argumentation. Assignments will include a visual analysis paper, a research paper focusing on the aforementioned topics, and a final assignment that integrates personal narrative with digital-born argument. *Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric 
Prof. Matthew Capdevielle
WR 13100-03/ TR 9:35A to 10:50A

What is the difference between manipulating and convincing someone? Is there anyone with whom we share no common ground? To what degree are we bound to respond to others? These are ethical questions: by their very nature they entail a consideration of our relations with others. And our relations with others take shape in language. This studio/workshop course seeks to explore the ethical issues of reasoned dialogue with special emphasis on persuasion. It is a course in argument as a way of reasoning with others by advancing claims and supporting them with evidence. Through a series of papers and seminar discussions, we will work to see how academic argument is more than just staking out a position and supporting it; argument involves understanding the different ways that issues may be viewed by members of different audiences and communities. In order to gain this perspective, we will work, as Aristotle tells us, to "see the available means of persuasion" in any given situation. This is the art of rhetoric. Through this effort to consider multiple perspectives, we create the conditions for true dialogue. And it is through dialogue that we can responsibly create knowledge. We will work together to develop our rhetorical awareness so we can better respond to the world in which we find ourselves and become full participants in the dialogue that defines and shapes our intellectual community. *Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.


Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetoric, Ethics, and Cultural Community  
Prof. Elizabeth Capdevielle
WR 13100-04 / MWF 1:00P to 1:50P

This writing studio course includes guided discussions, intensive workshops, extensive drafting processes, and one-on-one conferences with the professor, all designed to help students sharpen their rhetorical skills and put them to good use in university-level academic writing. Student professionalism is essential in this fun, challenging, and highly focused collaborative environment, as we study the messages that shape our culture today. Assignments and discussions address a wide variety of topics, from politics to commercial advertising to science. Each student completes a major research paper project, developing an original question on a topic that suits his or her own interests and values, while becoming comfortable using an academic research library. Along with taking a leadership role in discussion, each student also practices public speaking by presenting original research in a formal talk. We complete the course with final reflections on rhetoric and ethics in our cultural communities. *Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric 
Prof. Matthew Capdevielle
WR 13100-05/ TR 8:00A to 9:15A

What is the difference between manipulating and convincing someone? Is there anyone with whom we share no common ground? To what degree are we bound to respond to others? These are ethical questions: by their very nature they entail a consideration of our relations with others. And our relations with others take shape in language. This studio/workshop course seeks to explore the ethical issues of reasoned dialogue with special emphasis on persuasion. It is a course in argument as a way of reasoning with others by advancing claims and supporting them with evidence. Through a series of papers and seminar discussions, we will work to see how academic argument is more than just staking out a position and supporting it; argument involves understanding the different ways that issues may be viewed by members of different audiences and communities. In order to gain this perspective, we will work, as Aristotle tells us, to "see the available means of persuasion" in any given situation. This is the art of rhetoric. Through this effort to consider multiple perspectives, we create the conditions for true dialogue. And it is through dialogue that we can responsibly create knowledge. We will work together to develop our rhetorical awareness so we can better respond to the world in which we find ourselves and become full participants in the dialogue that defines and shapes our intellectual community. *Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.


Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetoric, Ethics, and Cultural Community 
Prof. Elizabeth Capdevielle
WR 13100-06/ MWF 11:40A to 12:30P

This writing studio course includes guided discussions, intensive workshops, extensive drafting processes, and one-on-one conferences with the professor, all designed to help students sharpen their rhetorical skills and put them to good use in university-level academic writing. Student professionalism is essential in this fun, challenging, and highly focused collaborative environment, as we study the messages that shape our culture today. Assignments and discussions address a wide variety of topics, from politics to commercial advertising to science. Each student completes a major research paper project, developing an original question on a topic that suits his or her own interests and values, while becoming comfortable using an academic research library. Along with taking a leadership role in discussion, each student also practices public speaking by presenting original research in a formal talk. We complete the course with final reflections on rhetoric and ethics in our cultural communities. *Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric: The Art of Conversation
Prof. Laura MacGowan
WR 13100-07 / TR 3:55P to 5:10P

You have important things to say, things that will help your world become more whole. This course aims to help you refine and communicate those things, those "arguments," in order to maximize their positive impact. Good arguments are less about fighting, and more about engaging in productive conversation that is based on sound claims supported by true evidence. With this definition in mind, we'll spend this semester working on becoming better conversationalists. We'll think about what it means to be careful and compassionate listeners, especially to opinions and communication styles different from our own, and to evaluate and analyze the messages we hear on a daily basis. We'll also consider what it means for us to be responsible contributors to that conversation through ethical, effective writing. Practically, we'll spend most of our time working in public-facing genres-major assignments include a public letter, a feature article (à la The Atlantic), and a TED Talk. We'll become better researchers, learning to integrate academic and non-academic sources into our own thinking, and we'll practice the writing and revision strategies that will enable us to articulate our ideas with excellence. *Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric 
Prof. Adam Kerker
WR 13100-08/ MWF 8:00A to 8:50A

Writing and Rhetoric both prepares students for and engages them in new writing and rhetorical situations, especially those they will encounter as members of the university community. At its core, this course offers instruction and practice in inquiry, writing as a process, thinking rhetorically, using sources, and giving and receiving feedback. As a student in this class, you will learn to ask questions about complex issues, to find ways of answering those questions no matter how challenging they may be, and to shape your research findings for a variety of purposes and audiences. You will also learn ways of gathering and evaluating sources, taking notes and observing patterns between texts, and producing your own original texts that meet different rhetorical goals. Assignments include a rhetorical analysis essay, in which you will assess the rhetorical dimensions of a speech, video, or written piece, and a research essay presenting your intervention in a scholarly conversation on a topic that interests you.

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Joanna Want
WR 13100-09 / TR 9:35A to 10:50A

In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of rhetorical genre theory and build a framework for successfully navigating new writing situations at the university and beyond. Using genre, rhetorical situation, and rhetorical virtues as guiding concepts, we will begin the course by studying the rhetoric of public health campaigns. We will then take a deep dive into a single genre: the Op-Ed. Finally, following instruction in academic research at Hesburgh Library, students will compose a researched community proposal and present their work in the final week of class. Class periods will include a mixture of discussion, in-class writing, small group work, and writing workshop. Students will work closely with one another and the instructor as they craft a portfolio of revised and compelling writing.*Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric 
Prof. Jacob Schepers
WR 13100-10 / TR 2:20P to 3:35P

This writing course requires us to tackle big issues, ask big questions, and respond in big ways. Said otherwise, this course will challenge each of us to develop and refine our critical thinking skills and translate those thoughts into something more tangible and communicative¿in short, our writing. With these expectations in mind, this is a course in academic writing to prepare you for collegial and professional expectations. It is, of course, much more than that, and we will be working together throughout the semester to work to develop as better thinkers and writers (not simply to write better papers).*Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetoric of Wellness
Prof. Heidi Arndt
WR 13100-11 / MWF 10:25A to 11:15A

What does it mean to be well? Thanks to the popularity of concepts like self care, mindfulness, and sustainability, we may feel pressured to increase our own and our community’s wellness, but the sheer volume of content can be overwhelming. In this class, we will take a closer look at the sources that construct and constrain our understanding of “the good life” in order to become critical consumers and producers of wellness content. Especially in light of the global health crisis, it’s now more important than ever to consider how we talk about wellness and the effect of our rhetoric on others. Over the course of the semester we will move from an inward focus on physical and mental wellness to an outward look at environmental and social spheres. By analyzing and responding to existing arguments about everything from skincare to zero-waste households, you will develop a keen rhetorical awareness that will inform your own writing on these topics. Because everyone wants to be well, but not everyone agrees on what that looks like, we must also carefully consider the ethics involved in making claims on these topics, and our responsibility to our readers.*Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric 
Prof. Joanna Want
WR 13100-12 / TR 11:10A to 12:25P

In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of rhetorical genre theory and build a framework for successfully navigating new writing situations at the university and beyond. Using genre, rhetorical situation, and rhetorical virtues as guiding concepts, we will begin the course by studying the rhetoric of public health campaigns. We will then take a deep dive into a single genre: the Op-Ed. Finally, following instruction in academic research at Hesburgh Library, students will compose a researched community proposal and present their work in the final week of class. Class periods will include a mixture of discussion, in-class writing, small group work, and writing workshop. Students will work closely with one another and the instructor as they craft a portfolio of revised and compelling writing.*Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.*Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetorics of the Digital
Prof. Nathaniel Myers
WR 13100-13 / TR 3:55P to 5:10P

Is it possible that, by the time you finish college, a machine will be able to write essays better than you, your classmates, and your professors? Well, not likely for any of us--and yet, we live in a world where this situation doesn't seem outside the realm of possibility. Already it is clear that our digital world exerts a powerful effect on us, such that we seem as much tools of our computers and iPhones as they are tools for us. We live our lives through an Instagram filter, in the 140-character tweet, and with a 10-second Snapchat video. In this course, we will consider the rhetorics of our digital world and the literacies (visual, digital, information) we require to negotiate that world, literacies we are already, however unwittingly, quite skilled in. Alongside text-based scholarship, we will draw on film, video essays, and other media platforms to formulate our own claims, discussion, and writing around topics like new media, information literacy and "post-truth" culture, and digital-born composition and argumentation. Assignments will include a visual analysis paper, a research paper focusing on the aforementioned topics, and a final assignment that integrates personal narrative with digital-born argument. *Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Nick Mainieri
WR 13100-14 / TR 3:55P to 5:10P

This course asks you to generate conscientious, informed, and ethical arguments about your world, as we draw our class readings, discussions, and possibilities for original research from the scholarly (and sometimes popular) conversations surrounding a variety of issues. You will identify subject matter that interests you and then purposefully explore it with intelligent questions in order to engage with contemporary intellectual dialogue through your writing. With several formal essay assignments, you will analyze specific rhetorical texts and/or contexts, while practicing the artful and ethical applications of argument and persuasion.

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Arpit Kumar
WR 13100-15 / MWF 1:00P to 1:50P

The coronavirus outbreak, the U.S. presidential election of 2020, and the release of the next James Bond film are examples of public events which generate opinion on various media platforms. In our class, we shall ask how public opinion is shaped using rhetoric. Various stakeholders influence public opinion through media platforms such as the news, advertising, social networks, film, books etc. We shall analyze representative public "events", the rhetorical situations they create, and understand how acts of speech and writing create moments of persuasion. We will emphasize the inherently ethical relations persuasion places us in and attempt to cultivate rhetorical virtues of truthfulness, sincerity, and responsibility. Participants will write weekly forum posts, 3 short assignments and a research paper while engaging in invigorating discussions.*Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Jacob Schepers
WR 13100-17 / TR 12:45P to 2:00P

This writing course requires us to tackle big issues, ask big questions, and respond in big ways. Said otherwise, this course will challenge each of us to develop and refine our critical thinking skills and translate those thoughts into something more tangible and communicative¿in short, our writing. With these expectations in mind, this is a course in academic writing to prepare you for collegial and professional expectations. It is, of course, much more than that, and we will be working together throughout the semester to work to develop as better thinkers and writers (not simply to write better papers).*Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Kyriana Lynch
WR 13100-18 / MWF 9:10A to 10:00A

You already have writing experience, whether in the stories you tell friends, cover letters for job applications, or your college application essays. This course will build on your experience and equip you with tools and skills to craft your own narratives, analyze others’ evidence, and present research-based arguments. We will focus on using the concerns and interests that you already have in order to present your thoughts and yourself to the world in compelling and reflective ways. *Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric: The Rhetoric of Narrative 
Prof. Chanel Cox
WR 13100-19 / MWF 10:25A to 11:15A

"What I want to know . . . is whether an internet search has a plot. There is an intense interaction and a development, a personality, and even a rising conflict and eventual resolution." These humorous lines from the 2017 novel Dear Cyborgs highlight a central theme of this course: the close relationship between writing and narrative. Narrative offers a powerful rhetorical tool for writers and speakers seeking to connect with their audiences and are often present even whenever no "story" is explicitly being told. For instance, the presidential election slogan "Make America Great Again" creates a narrative about the United States. It gestures towards an unspecified past where America was great and argues that, though America no longer had that greatness, its citizens could obtain it again through the election. Every form of writing, from tweets, advertisements and newspaper articles to argumentative essays and research papers, generates a "narrative" in the selection, ordering, and presentation of materials. In this course you will not only learn to be a more critical consumer of the countless narratives that we encounter on a daily basis, but will learn how to skillfully and ethically craft your own. By teaching you to pay careful attention to narrative and other rhetorical choices in writing, this course will prepare you for college-level thinking, writing, and critical reading.

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Erik-john Fuhrer
WR 13100-20 / MWF 11:40A to 12:30P

           Course description forthcoming

Writing and Rhetoric 
Prof. Joanna Want
WR 13100-21 / TR 12:45P to 2:00P

In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of rhetorical genre theory and build a framework for successfully navigating new writing situations at the university and beyond. Using genre, rhetorical situation, and rhetorical virtues as guiding concepts, we will begin the course by studying the rhetoric of public health campaigns. We will then take a deep dive into a single genre: the Op-Ed. Finally, following instruction in academic research at Hesburgh Library, students will compose a researched community proposal and present their work in the final week of class. Class periods will include a mixture of discussion, in-class writing, small group work, and writing workshop. Students will work closely with one another and the instructor as they craft a portfolio of revised and compelling writing.*Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric: Ethical Discourse for Environmental and Racial Justice 
Prof. Kasey Swanke
WR 13100-22 / TR 12:45P to 2:00P

Albus Dumbledore remarked that "words are our most inexhaustible source of magic--capable of both inflicting injury and remedying it." Every day we encounter words and arguments, some of which are injurious to discourse and some of which promote peace, fairness, and dialogue. Focusing on texts and topics related to environmental and racial justice, you will learn how to become a critical consumer and producer of the everyday rhetoric you encounter in personal conversations, news, art, and other forms of argument. Our projects and texts prepare you for writing successfully in your current and future courses at Notre Dame. You will develop a diverse rhetorical toolkit and strategies for successful argumentation through studying rhetoric in commercial advertisements, film, scholarly journal articles, and college-level essays, to name just a few modes of persuasion.This course satisfies the core requirement to complete Writing and Rhetoric and an elective requirement for the minor in sustainability.*Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric 
Prof. Elizabeth Capdevielle
WR 13100-23/ MWF 9:10A to 10:00A

This writing studio course includes guided discussions, intensive workshops, extensive drafting processes, and one-on-one conferences with the professor, all designed to help students sharpen their rhetorical skills and put them to good use in university-level academic writing. Student professionalism is essential in this fun, challenging, and highly focused collaborative environment, as we study the messages that shape our culture today. Assignments and discussions address a wide variety of topics, from politics to commercial advertising to science. Each student completes a major research paper project, developing an original question on a topic that suits his or her own interests and values, while becoming comfortable using an academic research library. Along with taking a leadership role in discussion, each student also practices public speaking by presenting original research in a formal talk. We complete the course with final reflections on rhetoric and ethics in our cultural communities. *Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.


Writing and Rhetoric: The Rhetoric of Resistance
Prof. Mer Kaplan
WR 13100-24 / TR 9:35A to 10:50A

Is resistance futile? What, exactly, constitutes an act of resistance? Why do some expressions of resistance spark a movement while others fizzle before they flourish? This class will focus on the rhetoric of resistance, from classical examples to current causes. We'll explore how resistance can be enacted in such forms as the written and spoken word, music, art, and film. Additionally we will delve into how, exactly, these pieces push against or re-frame mainstream rhetoric as well as address counterarguments that may complicate the conversation. Major class projects include a narrative essay, a rhetorical analysis, a visual analysis, and a research essay of your own design.*Note: this will be a hybrid taught course. 

Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetoric and American Identity 
Prof. Hades Chavanne
WR 13100-25 / TR 9:35A to 10:50A

What factors shaped the formation of the Unites States¿ national identity, and how does that national identity influence who we become as individuals? In this course, we will investigate the ways in which rhetoric practices produce and shape the socio-cultural aspects of American identity, ideals, and ethics. We will critically examine various forms of written, oral, and visual cultural artifacts, considering their rhetorically mediated social, racial, political, gendered, cultural, and economic frameworks. It is through these frameworks that we navigate our existence: how we understand who we are, what our place in the world is, and what our moral responsibilities to ourselves and to others are. Throughout this course, students will build upon their critical thinking, writing, and research skills through the ethical rhetorical lenses which we will develop together. *Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Ian Gerdon
WR 13100-26 / MWF 10:25A to 11:15A

Can people change their minds? Can they find common ground? Why would they bother to try? From Aristotle to George Washington to the study of 20th century totalitarianism, we find a similar theme: when people can’t or won’t talk to each other, violence and tyranny are on the horizon. Without dialogue and the trust that makes it possible, self-governance and a meaningful search for truth may be doomed. So how does dialogue work, how does persuasion work, and what kind of people do we need to be to make them work?

In this class, we will consider why we communicate and what standards and goals guide our efforts to communicate effectively as well as ethically. In the process, we will examine how to read and write as forms of dialogue, how Aristotle’s theory of persuasion can illuminate our public discourse, how persuasion differs from propaganda, and what the barriers to and possibilities of dialogue are today, as well as how we can tell stories that are both true and meaningful. We’ll take our lead from philosophy, literature, art, politics, and religion. In the end, hopefully, we’ll emerge as better students, citizens, and human beings—as well as better writers. *Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Ian Gerdon
WR 13100-27 / MWF 2:30P to 3:20P

Can people change their minds? Can they find common ground? Why would they bother to try? From Aristotle to George Washington to the study of 20th century totalitarianism, we find a similar theme: when people can’t or won’t talk to each other, violence and tyranny are on the horizon. Without dialogue and the trust that makes it possible, self-governance and a meaningful search for truth may be doomed. So how does dialogue work, how does persuasion work, and what kind of people do we need to be to make them work?

In this class, we will consider why we communicate and what standards and goals guide our efforts to communicate effectively as well as ethically. In the process, we will examine how to read and write as forms of dialogue, how Aristotle’s theory of persuasion can illuminate our public discourse, how persuasion differs from propaganda, and what the barriers to and possibilities of dialogue are today, as well as how we can tell stories that are both true and meaningful. We’ll take our lead from philosophy, literature, art, politics, and religion. In the end, hopefully, we’ll emerge as better students, citizens, and human beings—as well as better writers. *Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Marjorie Housley
WR 13100-28 / TR 11:10A to 12:25P

 This course is an introduction to rhetoric, writing, and research. Throughout the semester, we will gain and develop skills in identifying, analyzing, and creating arguments across a variety of media, forms, and genres. The texts we read and write about will focus on the role of identity in creating and consuming texts: whose voices are heard? How do those voices express ideas, and how do they get (mis)interpreted? Who is a text's audience, and how does that affect these questions?Drawing on scholarly and popular texts, and written and visual sources, we will consider how ?we? as an audience change in relation to the form/context in which an argument is presented, and how ?we? as authors can use form/context to make arguments more effective. Throughout the class, we will work collectively to develop and maintain a writing and learning community that is committed to ethical engagements with the source material and with one another.

WR 13300: Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Erin McLaughlin
WR 13300-01 / MWF 11:40A to 12:30P

  This course is an introduction to rhetoric, writing, and research. As a multimedia-focused course, we will identify, analyze, and compose arguments across a variety of media. Our reading and writing efforts this semester will center on the role of identity and community values in argumentation. Drawing from a variety of scholarly and popular source material, we will explore how key dimensions of digital culture shape the way we experience and react to arguments in a digital age. Throughout these discussions, we will give special attention to ethical virtues of argumentation and the form those virtues take across argumentative forms and contexts.

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Erin McLaughlin
WR 13300-02 / MWF 10:25A to 11:15A

This course is an introduction to rhetoric, writing, and research. As a multimedia-focused course, we will identify, analyze, and compose arguments across a variety of media. Our reading and writing efforts this semester will center on the role of identity and community values in argumentation. Drawing from a variety of scholarly and popular source material, we will explore how key dimensions of digital culture shape the way we experience and react to arguments in a digital age. Throughout these discussions, we will give special attention to ethical virtues of argumentation and the form those virtues take across argumentative forms and contexts.

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Erin McLaughlin
WR 13300-03 / MWF 1:00P to 1:50P

This course is an introduction to rhetoric, writing, and research. As a multimedia-focused course, we will identify, analyze, and compose arguments across a variety of media. Our reading and writing efforts this semester will center on the role of identity and community values in argumentation. Drawing from a variety of scholarly and popular source material, we will explore how key dimensions of digital culture shape the way we experience and react to arguments in a digital age. Throughout these discussions, we will give special attention to ethical virtues of argumentation and the form those virtues take across argumentative forms and contexts.

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric: Digital Arguments
Prof. Patrick Clauss
WR 13300-04 / TR 12:45P to 2:00P

Two thousand years ago, someone wanting to share a message--to influence others--had a rather limited set of options: That person could write a letter, shout in a public place, or perhaps send up smoke signals. Today, communicators have an unprecedented number of options, including television, radio, cell phones, YouTube, Twitter . . . the list goes on. Available media have exploded in recent years. However, have the fundamental components of the messages themselves also changed? What about ethical argument methods and structures--have they changed, too? Finally, what might we learn about digital arguments, for instance, from Aristotle’s classic On Rhetoric? Such questions will guide our work this semester as we investigate the ways humans use (and misuse) symbols, like language, to influence others in the 21st century. 

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Joel Kempff
WR 13300-05 / TR 11:10A to 12:25P

The ways we communicate with one another have always been various and evolving. But now, more than ever, we are presented with myriad mediums of expression. No longer are we confined to text on a page or in-person public address. Now, we compose arguments and present them via email, tweet, video conference, YouTube, Instagram, or TikTok¿the mediums are many, and their ability to reach massive audiences grows greater every day. And, because we are so often behind keyboards and screens, we are offered the unprecedented opportunity to not only carefully craft our arguments, but also to carefully craft our digital identity. Understanding how we compose our digital selves is a vital part of understanding how we present arguments in the 21st century. As a multimedia focused course, we will identify, analyze, and ultimately craft rhetorical arguments across a range of media. We will combine the scholarship of rhetoric and ethical argumentation with material from various popular mediums in order to interrogate how the methods and structures of classical rhetoric and ethics continue to inform the way we consume and create arguments for this digital millennium. Throughout the semester we will consider how to construct not only ethical digital arguments but also ethical digital selves.*Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.*Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric: Rhetoric of the Body
Prof. Mayra Cano
WR 13300-06 / MWF 11:40A to 12:30P

Everyone has a body; however, how might our bodies inform and dictate our different experiences? This course will examine rhetorical approaches to the body as a means of addressing larger issues regarding analysis, research, and argumentation. Utilizing various understandings of the body, we will read the body as a text to consider how the body acts as a persuasive and powerful agent in our political, cultural, and global discourse. This consideration of the body will allow us to examine and investigate the various intersections of identity, popular culture, and politics to unpack, expand, and challenge our own worldviews. Throughout the semester, these understanding of the body will lead us to develop critical thinking skills, research skills, and revision skills that will expand our writing abilities and world views beyond the limitations of our bodily experiences. *Note: this will be a hybrid taught course.

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric: Digital Arguments
Prof. Patrick Clauss
WR 13300-07 / TR 2:00P to 3:15P

Two thousand years ago, someone wanting to share a message--to influence others--had a rather limited set of options: That person could write a letter, shout in a public place, or perhaps send up smoke signals. Today, communicators have an unprecedented number of options, including television, radio, cell phones, YouTube, Twitter . . . the list goes on. Available media have exploded in recent years. However, have the fundamental components of the messages themselves also changed? What about ethical argument methods and structures--have they changed, too? Finally, what might we learn about digital arguments, for instance, from Aristotle’s classic On Rhetoric? Such questions will guide our work this semester as we investigate the ways humans use (and misuse) symbols, like language, to influence others in the 21st century. 

Winter Session Courses

Multimedia Writing and Rhetoric
Prof. Nicole MacLaughlin & Prof. Damian Zurro
WR 13300-08 / (1)MTWRF 1:00P to 3:35P
                         (2)W 11:58P to 11:59P

Because researching and composing arguments is increasingly linked to technological tools, multimedia sections of Writing and Rhetoric teach students how to make the most of a wide array of resources. From standard tools, such as Google Docs, to more powerful web-based tools and publications, students in multimedia sections use textual, audio, and visual technology to its fullest while exploring the unique opportunities and challenges of composing in the 21st century. Our course combines traditional sessions with hands-on studio sessions, where students will be guided in class through the steps successful writers take as they craft their own texts. Students will learn strategies and skills which are transferable to writing across academic, personal and public contexts. While students do not need any prior technological skills, they should be ready to learn many of these skills over the course of the semester.


Advanced Writing and Rhetoric

Prof. Matthew Capdevielle
WR 13400-02 / (1) MTWRF  1:00P to 3:00P
                         (2) W 11:58P to 11:59P

This course is an intensive study of advanced rhetoric through the lens of one of the most powerful rhetorical forms: the letter. Letters are a form of writing that we all practice in our personal, professional and civic lives. Through a study of published letters that have influenced policy decisions, effected social change and simply moved their readers, we will examine the unique power of persuasion in the epistolary mode. Exploring together the subgenres of personal letters (e.g. letters home, letters of gratitude and apology, love letters), professional letters (e.g. memos, complaints, recommendations, resignation letters, letters of application) and public letters (e.g. encyclicals, letters to the editor, open letters), students will compose and revise a series of letters within these subgenres to extend and hone their persuasive writing skills through the practice of ethical and effective rhetoric in the epistolary mode. At a time when our relationships with others are under great strain ¿ both due to the physical distancing necessitated by the pandemic and due to the deep ideological divisions in our communities ¿ we need more than ever to cultivate the skill of establishing meaningful and durable connections with our fellow human beings. This course puts that effort to connect at the center of our study of rhetoric and provides new tools to engage meaningfully with others via writing.

Scientific Writing (Grad)
Prof. Michelle Marvin
WR 60500-01 / (1) TR 1:00P to 2:45P
                         (2) W 11:58P to 11:59P

This course offers graduate students in the sciences and engineering a focused study of the conventions of scientific writing, fostering a clearer understanding of what constitutes good writing in these fields. Through close analysis of published scientific papers, guest lectures from faculty in the sciences and engineering, and focused writing activities in a workshop environment, students will hone their writing skills and make a clear plan for their continued development as writers in their home disciplines.

Article Accelerator
Prof. Shinjinni Chattopadhyay
WR 92600-01 / (1) F 2:00P to 3:00P

The Article Accelerator is a 12-week course designed to help graduate students and postdocs make consistent progress toward revising an existing piece of writing, such as a conference paper, seminar paper, or dissertation chapter, into an article manuscript ready to be submitted to a journal. Students will be assigned reading from Wendy Laura Belcher's book Writing Your Journal Article in Twelve Weeks and meet weekly to discuss the reading, check in with peers on progress and productivity, and participate in peer-editing exercises designed to model good article-preparation practices alongside Belcher's recommendations. Students will receive a loan copy of Belcher's book, to be returned to the Writing Center on the last day of class.